psychologism


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psychologism

(sī-kŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
The explanation or interpretation of events or ideas in psychological terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesizing that we possess a logical faculty so described, Hanna contends, best enables us to (i) avoid logical psychologism, (ii) explain the apparent unity of logic in the face of a multiplicity of (sometimes incompatible) logics (the e pluribus unum problem) and (iii) make peace with the fact that logic is presupposed in any defense of logic (the logocentric predicament).
This was rather viciously attacked in Frege's work as psychologism; briefly, it was the assumption that any given discipline could be cashed out in the language of cognitive schemes, stimuli and responses, or whatever the psychology de jour was.
For instance, as even a cursory glance at the large corpus of work on "the age of anger" will show, the theses of psychologism and media manipulation are informed mostly by individual (albeit arresting and rich) anecdotes rather than sustained empirical evidence for how particular media-driven or psychological/emotional dynamics actually induce individuals to undertake the specific political action of voting for a populist political party.
If we presuppose that we know what love is, or what fear is, according to a certain strain of transcendental psychologism or by reference to a particular brand of neurobiology, then we undermine our project with anachronism from the very beginning.
Second, phenomenology sets aside or "brackets" other methodologies, such as empiricism and psychologism, without prejudice or antagonism, in order to make its own unique epistemological contribution (Husserl 1962: sec.
It formed the core of Edmund Husserl's anger against psychologism in logic (Husserl 1970, Burrowes 2010:74-82).
The difficulty resides in the notion that any treatment or interpretation of characters outside of the conception of pure theatrical construct--manifest mechanism for the objective correlation of other thematic concerns--will usually lead to the mine-field of psychologism and psychological empiricism that only have appropriate application in the real world.
Spezio details a specific manifestation of this problem in his discussion of widespread "psychologism" among neuroscientists.
Indeed, even the names "modest actual mentalism" or "the psychological approach to interpretation" used now by Carroll (2011, 135) to describe his position suggest that actual intentionalism is guilty of a kind of psychologism, to borrow a term from the German philosopher Gottlob Frege (or commits the "psychologistic fallacy", if one must trade in fallacies).
Aspects of Psychologism, Harvard University Press, Cambridge (MA), 2014, 365 PP