psychologism


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psychologism

(sī-kŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
The explanation or interpretation of events or ideas in psychological terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
42) Psychologism was a popular 'school' of philosophy in the late 19th century when the particular science of psychology began to separate itself from philosophy as a new science in its own right.
If we presuppose that we know what love is, or what fear is, according to a certain strain of transcendental psychologism or by reference to a particular brand of neurobiology, then we undermine our project with anachronism from the very beginning.
Burrowes, James (2010) "Husserl's Arguments against logical psychologism and his conception of ideal objects".
Beiser also writes as if the critique of psychologism were somehow inevitable.
A genuine thinker should look for a meta-language, a meta-paradigm for science; one that is free of the usual kinds of pretense and bigotry we encounter from time to time in the history of thought, especially modern thought: a journey from Cartesian dualism to Spinozaic monism to Berkeleyan psychologism via the weary intellectual bridges of Hume, Kant, Hegel, Husserl, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein (both the analytic young Wittgenstein and the post-modern old Wittgenstein).
Psychologism is correct to refuse the separation of knowing and judging, and we should not remain on the level of the distinction between the content and the act of judgment.
Moreover, none of those causes for Deanne's conclusion may have happened in her awareness, so the analyst must commit psychologism, something well known to be anathema to deductivists.
The traditional Austrian approach is basically "praxeological" as opposed to the naive psychologism of Walras, Gossen, and Jevons (especially when it comes to viewing utility more as a psychological feeling than as the concrete form of actions which express preferences).
Psychologism entails a self-refuting skepticism, and can be overcome only if it is possible to present an alternative account of the status of logic and objectivity.
Of the three re-published articles, there are welcome returns for Charles Taylor, who originally set the ball rolling, as well as Alisdair Maclntyre's not-so-veiled critique of psychologism via Hegel's own discussion of his contemporaries' scientific approaches to questions of action.
Let me emphasize here the merit of Husserl's tightrope act of not letting go of the mental acts he saw as necessary components of language while at the same time avoiding what has been called Locke's psychologism.
The narrator characterizes it, approvingly, "as an outburst of disgust at the indecent psychologism then current.