psycholinguistics

(redirected from psycholinguists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

psycholinguistics

 [si″ko-ling-gwis´tiks]
the study of psychological factors involved in the development and use of language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks),
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, that affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psycholinguistics

(sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

Psychology The study of factors affecting activities of communicating and understanding verbal information; the study of the manner in which language is acquired, stored, integrated and retrieved. See Kinesics, Language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, which affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the psycholinguist's analysis might inspire stimulus class research to illuminate the behavioral processes by which such learning is encouraged.
As we sat together looking at my paper in the privacy of the adjoining classroom, the professor made a wry face and remarked "I don't get it, it's as if you had a psycholinguist and a sociolinguist inside your head, you're using terms from all over the place...".
The research team included cognitive psychologists, psycholinguists, survey methodologists and computer scientists from both universities, as well as collaborators from AT and T Research.
The semantically implied irregular inflection effect may not have a major impact on the field of cognitive linguistics because it strays too far from traditional methods of research rooted in the ongoing theoretical debate in psycholinguists described at the beginning of this paper.
For psycholinguists, the particular reality that must be constructed piecemeal from data by each language learner is, of course, the grammar of a language.
If I write "cat," what comes up: "To feed?" "To let in?" "Cat scratch fever?" If I write "bomb," what then: "Go off?" "Terrorist?" Perhaps, "fail?" Psycholinguists (like George Lakoff, who first came to my attention with the book he co-authored with philosopher Mark Johnson, Metaphors We Live By), analyze, among many other things, morphology, syntax, and semantics (which I highlight because of what Hicok does to them), being simply stated, words and the rules that we apply to them (as opposed to phonology which looks at the smallest unit of attention not as words but in terms of sounds themselves); the order of words and the rules of sentence construction; and how we take meaning out of the words and sentences we constructed by all those rules and what the rules of meaning-making are.
The last stage in the construction of the STAXI was stimulated by the research of psycholinguists, who identified English metaphors for anger, which called attention to the need to distinguish between two different mechanisms for controlling anger expression (Lakoff, 1987).
This glossary can be used by linguists, psycholinguists, sociolinguists, students of linguistics, EFL learners, and scholars interested in conducting research in the field of language acquisition.
Psycholinguists have formulated fundamental criticism of this conclusion and offered alternative models.
From most psycholinguists point of view, attitude and motivation play a major role in the second/foreign language learning (Gardner, 1985; Oxford and Shearin, 1996; Dornyei, 1990).