psycholinguistics

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Related to psycholinguistic: sociolinguistic

psycholinguistics

 [si″ko-ling-gwis´tiks]
the study of psychological factors involved in the development and use of language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks),
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, that affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psycholinguistics

(sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of language as a form of behavior, including language development, speech, and personality.

psycholinguistics

Psychology The study of factors affecting activities of communicating and understanding verbal information; the study of the manner in which language is acquired, stored, integrated and retrieved. See Kinesics, Language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, which affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]
References in periodicals archive ?
This sort of psycholinguistic aspect of the formation and meaning predictability of novel complex words has not yet been studied either in word-formation or in word-interpretation, not to speak of its comprehensive analysis in an integrated formation-interpretation research project.
More research should be conducted to focus on non-academic registers of written language, delving into psycholinguistic processes.
Cross-linguistic influence in third language acquisition: psycholinguistic perspectives.
Section 2 of this paper (42-54) outlines "a small selection of key translational issues" (without making the criteria for this selection explicit), while section 3 (54-59) describes the work of several research groups using psycholinguistics as a basis to study the translation process.
These varied and contrasting psycholinguistic characteristics are indicators of the underlying process of reading any given word.
125 Psycholinguistic research has suggested that jurors "understand and remember familiar terms more easily than uncommon words and phrases.
Research with linguistic stimuli requires tools for computing psycholinguistic statistics in order to select and manipulate the word parameters that the researcher has got in mind.
Fundamentally, there are two different classes of WMM with respect to the nature and views of the memory mechanism: (1) non-linguistic model and (2) psycholinguistic model of working memory (Nimmo and Roodenrys 2004).