psychogram


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psychogram

 [si´ko-gram]
2. a visual sensation associated with a mental idea, such as a certain number which appears visualized when it is thought of.
References in periodicals archive ?
The psychogram (or psychological monography) is an inventory, a description, an expertise and cataloguing the psychological demands for each player.
(16) That de Gaultier should have recourse to a fictional text in his effort to construct a psychogram of psychic deviancy illustrates how murky is the exchange of cultural energies.
The author tells a rather exciting story about the psychogram of a young egotist, including his image in the mirror of other critical persons whose opinions the reader shares - an egotist whose profession is designing houses for happy families.
One could call it a psychogram of a sadist compelled to torture a man to death while his own child lies dying.
Garcia Marquez is no more interested in Viennese scrimshaw than Nabokov was, but contemplate this psychogram: Bolivar lost his father at age 2; his mother at age 8; his wife, to yellow fever, at age 19.
He is preoccupied with supposedly threatening human objects, which is reflected in an abnormally high movement responses (M column) having sinister content in the Rorschach psychogram. Typically, the contents include figures which are unreal or pseudohuman, such as ogres, monsters, horrific fictional characters and animals with destructive human-like attributes.
Figure 1 shows the scores of the subjects on the psychogram. It appears that majority of her responses are on the left side reflecting introversive tendencies and weak emotional reactivity.
Lisette Gebhardt in "Psychogramme einer verlorenen Generation: Kindheit und Adoleszenz in der zeitgenossischen japanischen Literatur" (Psychograms of a lost generation: Childhood and adolescence in contemporary Japanese literature) considers five novels by authors ranging from Murakami Ryu to Kirino Natsuo as exemplary texts that both depict and critique the violence and precarity that underlie the contemporary experience of many Japanese children and adolescents.
Primary memory, a concept that here remains somewhat unclear, 'is always present, though not always at a conscious level': it calls up at the subconscious level those 'archetypal signs that our conscious memory can no longer define but that trigger deep associative reactions', source of, among other things, the evocative and emotional power of psychograms. The two other kinds of memory, however, 'occupy, each in turn, a pre-eminent position in the art of different periods ...
The aim of these pictures is not really to turn the subjects into the social types a critical analysis might sketch; instead, we might say, the works try to limn esoteric psychograms. Yet the zodiac signs--connoting astrology, sci-fi, and a general embrace of the mystical--also open the paintings to woefully down-market intellectual and aesthetic idioms.
The analysis of the data which we have gathered in the WARA project has enabled us to construct a global vision of the phenomenon of `art.' We have thus been able to identify three types of signs characteristic of elementary artistic structures: pictograms, ideograms, and psychograms. These structures accommodate nuances, differences between one geographical zone and another, one period and another, but the base is the same everywhere.
This makes them appear emotionally fraught; they are virtually psychograms or portraits--the building as a symbol of personal identity.