psychogenic purpura

psy·cho·gen·ic pur·pu·ra

a psychosomatic condition similar to autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Diamond-Gardner syndrome (DGS) which is also known as autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, painful bruising syndrome or psychogenic purpura was first described by Diamond-Gardner in 1955 (1).
Psychogenic purpura (autoerythrocyte sensitization): An unsolved dilemma.
Gardner Diamond syndrome (GDS) which is also known as autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, psychogenic purpura, painful bruising syndrome is a rare autoimmune vasculopathy which mostly recurs after emotional stress and which is characterized with painful ecchymotic lesions.
Autoerythrocyte sensitization (psychogenic purpura): a case report and review of the literature.
Psychogenic purpura, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and platelet dysfunction in the same patient.
(7.) Ratnoff OD: Psychogenic purpura (autoerythrocyte sensitization): An unsolved dilemma.
(9.) Ratnoff OD, Agle DP: Psychogenic purpura: A re-evaluation of the syndrome of autoerythrocyte sensitization.
Gardner Diamond Syndrome (Autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, Psychogenic purpura) (1) is a rare autoimmune vasculopathy (2) of little known etiology.
Later, Ratnoff and Agle named it Psychogenic purpura due to the association with psychiatric disorders (7)
Current literature on this matter is based on cases reported (162 up to 2009, of which only ten involve men) (2-8-9-10) In 1971 Lababidi & Friedman, described the first case of Psychogenic purpura in a man; after that, cases describe on the male sex are but a few, most of them take place during the third decade of life with lesions similar to those found on women.
The primary clinical feature of psychogenic purpura reported in the literature is recurring ecchymoses.
It is a medical opinion that, while psychogenic purpura may contribute to the formation of stigmata, it is unluckily to be the sole cause.