psychogenetic


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psy·cho·gen·e·tic

(sī-kō-gĕ-net'ik),
Refers to the interplay between genetic variability and psychological and psychiatric phenomena.
See also: psychogenic.
[psycho- + genetic]

psychogenetic

(sī″kō-jĕn-ĕt′ĭk)
1. Originating in the mind, as a disease.
2. Concerning formation of mental traits.

psy·cho·gen·e·tic

(sī-kō-gĕ-net'ik)
Refers to the interplay between genetic variability and psychological and psychiatric phenomena.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Piagetian psychogenetic study emphasizes the development of operational structures of intelligence during the first fifteen years of the individual's existence; 2.
In other words, it is a matter of discovering <<by which means the child effectively moves from a puerile mentality to an adult mentality, and allowing for that evolution to take place spontaneously, in the classroom, as it does in life>> (1928c, 57); and this by presupposing a structural isomorphism between the psychogenetic processes themselves and the principles of the Active School.
(31.) Also referred to as "psychogenetic" disorder, wherein a "physical symptom, disease process, or emotional state ...
(1) Norbert Elias discusses the concept of civilizing processes in European societies in his The Civilizing Process: Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations (Oxford; Cambridge: Blackwell, 2000).
Those that affect the voice are considered psychogenetic voice disorders.
According to a different explanation of the Resurrection, one advanced by Rudolf Bultmann and still proposed today, what we have here are psychogenetic visions, that is, subjective phenomena similar to hallucinations.
We may discern in contemporary masculinity studies a general confluence of positional and developmental notions of crisis, where masculinity is reasoned to be compromisable by collapse of exclusive structures of entitlement ("positions"), as well as constituting a psychogenetic conundrum that is specifically gendered and gendering.
This technique has been used by our group for the investigation of several genetic sequence variations of neurotransmitter systems in psychogenetic association studies (22,23).
For Elias, medieval society took for granted a "joy in killing and destruction that have been repressed from everyday civilized life" (The Civilizing Process: Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations, trans.
These psychogenetic affinities and ambiguities between carnal desires, cannibalism, death, and rebirth form the core symbolism of the mythopoeic imagery.
(29.) If the dull-witted, elephantine Ajax of Troilus and Cressida represents Shakespeare's satiric portrait of Ben Jonson, veiled ridicule includes (via the name Ajax) the implication that Jonson's psychogenetic makeup (and thus his art) are anal, preoccupied with anal functions.