psychodynamics

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Related to psychodynamically: Psychodynamic perspective

psychodynamics

 [si″ko-di-nam´iks]
the science of mental forces and motivations that influence human behavior and mental activity, including recognition of the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks),
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion. See: role-playing.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psychodynamics

(sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion.
See also: role-playing
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
Systematized study and theory of psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]
References in periodicals archive ?
Many studies address the efficacy of brief therapy by comparing it to long-range, psychodynamically based techniques.
These group fantasies were "psychodynamically interconnected and collectively shared"--in essence, a Zeitgeist (4).
Deviation from therapeutic abstinence is an anathema to many psychodynamically oriented therapists who contend that therapist self-disclosure of religious orientation is likely to inhibit the client from revealing private feelings, especially in morally sensitive areas (Rizutto, 1993).
She suggests that black thought in the era of the first abolitions of slavery, in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, was psychodynamically complex, since even her moderate antislavery views entailed a rebellion against her slaveholding father.
The psychodynamically oriented intervention of interpretation was provided to 80 percent (n = 16) of the routine individual treatment group.
Conversely, when used within the context of psychodynamically oriented sex therapy, the injections can be useful adjuncts for managing the resistance of certain patients with psychogenic ED (Kaplan, 1990).
On the other hand, what is monitored by social actors in the more covert informational channels is probably more often inhibited by social conventions and is more often psychodynamically repressed than what is in the overt informational messages.
JG: I'm primarily psychodynamically oriented, but I have a strong conviction that individual psychodynamic therapy is not usually sufficient for such patients and that you need to integrate psychodynamic therapy with social therapies, like group and family work.
However, enthusiasm to use this approach needs to be balanced with capability which can best be developed through training and either supervised practice by or jointly working with psychodynamically trained consultants.
Psychodynamically, the songs were used to elicit and process underlying and unexpressed issues and feelings, bringing them to conscious awareness.
Any psychiatrist who treats patients with major mental illness is familiar with this kind of psychodynamically informed case management.
It seems that Redford, instead of interpreting Maclean's material psychodynamically, responds with his own creative free-associations.