psychodrama

(redirected from psychodramatist)
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Related to psychodramatist: psychodramatic

psychodrama

 [si″ko-drah´mah]
a form of group psychotherapy in which patients dramatize their own or assigned life situations in order to achieve insight into personalities, relationships, conflicts, and emotional problems, and to alter faulty behavior patterns.

psy·cho·dra·ma

(sī'kō-drah'mā),
A method of psychotherapy in which patients act out their personal problems by spontaneously enacting without rehearsal diagnostically specific roles in dramatic performances put on before their patient peers.

psychodrama

(sī′kə-drä′mə, -drăm′ə)
n.
1. A psychotherapeutic technique in which people are assigned roles to be played spontaneously within a dramatic context devised by a therapist in order to understand the behavior of people with whom they have difficult interactions.
2. A dramatization in which this technique is employed.

psy′cho·dra·mat′ic (-drə-măt′ĭk) adj.
psy′cho·dram′a·tist (-drăm′ə-tĭst, -drä′mə-) n.

psychodrama

A technique developed by JL Moreno (1892–1974), which arose from his observation that people tend to play markedly different roles in their public and private lives.

Psychodrama techniques 
• Mirroring—A person’s behaviour is imitated by a “double”, so that the actor expresses the emotion which the person feels, but has been unable or unwilling to release.
• Role reversal—One person plays another’s role.
• Soliloquy—The actors describe feelings in connection with traumatic life events.

psy·cho·dra·ma

(sī'kō-drah'mă)
A method of psychotherapy in which patients act out their personal problems by spontaneously enacting without rehearsal diagnostically specific roles in dramatic performances put on before their patient peers.

psychodrama

A technique in PSYCHOTHERAPY in which the subject acts out relevant incidents or adopts particular roles, so allowing the expression of troublesome emotions or the contemplation of deep conflicts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table of survey results "I feel 9/11 changed the psychodramatist's profesion": None Some Extensively Blank 26 34 11 7 "As a result of 9/11, I sense the profession has changed as indicated:" None Some Extensively No response Training 42 28 3 5 Certification 63 8 0 7 Population Served 28 35 9 6 Ethical Issues 53 15 4 6 Org.
To find out psychodramatists' opinions about issues facing the profession that might have been affected by the terrorist acts of 09/11/2001, a survey was mailed to 200 individuals selected at random from the Directory of the American Board of Examiners in Psychodrama, Sociometry and Group Psychotherapy.
A psychodramatist or a lawyer with psychodrama training takes the lawyer out of his usual role and puts him, figuratively, into the client's home.
Though directed by longtime title designer Richard Greenberg, pic's real orchestrator is the self-proclaimed "psychodramatist" Dr.
In terms of practice as a psychodramatist, 6 reported 5 or less years, 19 reported 6-10 years, 23 said 11-20 years, 13 indicated 21-30 years, and 4 reported 31 or more years.
Question/Item Not At All Some Extensive Do you visualize the psychodrama profession changing in the next millennium 3 39 20 In what areas do you predict greatest changes: Training 8 40 14 Certification 11 41 11 Populations Served 8 29 27 Ethical Issues 11 37 15 Organizational Membership 8 41 11 Use of Technology 9 31 21 Recognition by Other Therapeutic Modalities 8 40 14 Feelings of Empowerment by Organization Members 12 37 12 Characteristics of the Psychodramatist 11 39 13
Through dramatic action the psychodramatist brings long-buried situations to the surface to relieve emotional pressure, creates a 'holding' environment through sharing, support and acceptance, and then allows the natural healing forces of the psyche and the emotional self to continue to work (Dayton, 1994, p.
She enumerates several similarities: Both hypnotist and psychodramatist work toward a `joining' with the patient ...
When the program branched out with the leadership of the trained psychodramatists, the sessions worked with different traumatized groups in Palestine.
This lack of connection between education and practice stems from the fact that psychodramatists tend to use their clinical notes, not for scientific research but, rather, for supervisory use or oral presentations in professional conferences (Gershoni, 2008; Villiotou, 2006).
Conducting Clinical Sociometric Explorations: A Manual for Psychodramatists and Sociometrists.
The authors range from theater practitioners or professionals, psychologists and psychodramatists, to correctional officers and inmates.