psychobiology


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Related to psychobiology: biopsychology

psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.

psychobiology

/psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ŏ-je)
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism.psychobiolog´ical

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.

psychobiology

[-bī′ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + bios, life, logos, science
1 the study of biochemical foundations of thought, mood, emotion, affect, and behavior.
2 personality development and functioning in terms of the interaction of the body and the mind.
3 a school of psychiatric thought introduced by Adolf Meyer that stresses total life experience, including biological, emotional, and sociocultural factors, in assessing the psychological makeup or mental status of an individual. psychobiological, adj.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
at the Department of Psychobiology and Coordinator of
Like Hall's theory of adolescence, Meyer's theory of psychobiology was also predicated on problematic biological assertions, which misappropriated psychoanalytic thought for behaviorist ends.
FPU Scholar in the Department of Basic Psychology, Psychobiology and Methodology.
It's an opportunity to learn relationship skills that support our highest selves--and to understand the psychobiology of both ourselves and our partners.
Casey, director of the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College.
This is contrasted with another trajectory emerging out of Sylvan Tomkins' psychobiology of differential affects, especially via the work of Eve Sedgwick, that draws on an articulation of Darwinian evolutionary hardwiring with aspects of Freudian psychoanalytic theory.
She is a 2008 graduate of Shepherd Hill Regional High School, and is majoring in psychobiology.
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Caroline had completed an honours degree in forensic psychobiology at Abertay University and planned to study to become a primary teacher.
Feinberg earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychobiology from UCLA in Los Angeles, California.
The Unwell Brain: Understanding the Psychobiology of Mental Health