psychobiology

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psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But with psychobiologists on our team, we know that it is not just the media that are to blame--that there is another piece to the puzzle.