psychobiology

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psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The study of the interrelationships of the biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
2. Adolf Meyer's term for psychiatry.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

psychobiology

(sī′kō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of psychology that studies the biological foundations of behavior, emotions, and mental processes. Also called biopsychology.

psy′cho·bi′o·log′ic (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
psy′cho·bi·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

psychobiology

Psychiatry A school of thought that views a person's biologic, psychologic, and social experiences as an integrated unit
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

psy·cho·bi·ol·o·gy

(sī'kō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the interrelationships of biology and psychology in cognitive functioning, including intellectual, memory, and related neurocognitive processes.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Each one of these periods can be important," he says-and they don't necessarily have the same effects," said David Crews, a psychobiologist.
Variability selection may have influenced mammals long before hominids strode onto the scene, asserts psychobiologist Lori Marino of Emory University in Atlanta.
Breslin, a sensory psychobiologist at the Monell Center.
"This significant report not only demonstrates for the first time an association between variants of the OB gene and measures of obesity and mood in humans, it also exemplifies the importance of examining the interactive effects of distinct, seemingly disparate genes on complex behavioral traits," writes psychobiologist Gerald J.
Kraemer, a developmental psychobiologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says the NIH team's "highly significant findings" support the theory that early experiences influence the physiological development of the brain, shaping its reaction to alcohol later in life.
Judith Shulevitz in The New Republic, reports that recent research by psychobiologists shows that human loneliness sends misleading hormonal signals, rejiggers the molecules on genes that govern behavior, and wrenches a slew of other systems out of whack.
Susan Imus, chair of Columbia College Chicago's graduate department of dance/movement therapy & counseling says, "Western medicine is beginning to accept a holistic approach to healing, such as that used in D/MT." Imus continues, "Psychobiologists are studying and proving the efficacy of nonverbal methods of communication to treat trauma." In fact, there is a current trend in the field of psychotherapy to focus on body-based modes of treatment.
Thirty years ago, students of the brain might have identified themselves as anatomists, physiologists, or psychobiologists, but today they would consider themselves neuroscientists.
(29) Drawing on the work of psychobiologists and neuropsychologists, DeLancey defends an affect program theory of the emotions, according to which they involve coordinated suites of physiological, phenomenological, and behavioral routines that are triggered by conditions of particular kinds.