pseudosarcomatous

pseudosarcomatous

/pseu·do·sar·co·ma·tous/ (-sahr-ko´mah-tus) mimicking sarcoma; used of both benign and malignant lesions that histologically resemble sarcoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) This entity belongs to a greater family of benign pseudosarcomatous lesions including proliferative fasciitis, nodular fasciitis, and intravascular fasciitis.
Includes benign and malignant proliferation including pure sarcoma, particularly in cases composed exclusively of spindle cells, leiomyosarcoma, carcinoma with pseudosarcomatous stroma and sarcomas with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia.
Pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic tumor and myosarcoma of the urogenital tract.
Nodular fasciitis, seen in the head and neck, is a pseudosarcomatous self-limiting process which shows a prominent whorled or feathery cellular pattern lacking inflammatory infiltrates.
It is also known as subcutaneous pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis, infiltrative fasciitis, or proliferative fasciitis.
Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a distinct pseudosarcomatous lesion arising in the soft tissues and interior organs of children and young adults.
Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the bladder was first described in 1980 by Roth [1]; it is a rare benign myofibroblastic proliferation that has been given several designations, including inflammatory pseudotumor, inflammatory pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor, nodular fasciitis, pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic tumor, and fibromyxoid pseudotumor [2].
4] Because of its histological heterogeneity, it has received many names over the past years, including plasma cell pseudotumor, inflammatory pseudotumor, xanthomatous pseudotumor, pseudosarcomatous myofibroblastic proliferation, inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, atypical fibromyxoid tumor and atypical myofibroblastic tumour.
Differential diagnoses for MO include osteosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, osteochondroma, foreign-body granuloma, giant cell tumor of soft tissue (osteoclastoma), atypical fibroxanthoma, pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis (nodular fasciitis), and deep vein thrombosis.
It was first described as a distinct entity by Konwaler et al in 1955; they called it pseudosarcomatous fibromatosis.
Pseudosarcomatous proliferative lesions of soft tissues.