pseudoparalysis


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pseudoparalysis

 [soo″do-pah-ral´ĭ-sis]
apparent loss of muscular power without real paralysis.
Parrot's pseudoparalysis (syphilitic pseudoparalysis) pseudoparalysis of one or more extremities in infants, due to syphilitic osteochondritis of an epiphysis.

pseu·do·pa·ral·y·sis

(sū'dō-pă-ral'i-sis),
Apparent paralysis due to voluntary inhibition of motion because of pain, incoordination, or other cause, but without actual paralysis.
Synonym(s): pseudoparesis (1)

pseudoparalysis

(so͞o′dō-pə-răl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
A voluntary restriction or inhibition of motion because of pain, incoordination, or other cause, not due to actual muscular paralysis.

pseudoparalysis

(1) Hysterical paralysis, see there.
(2) A rarely used term for a paralysis-like state due to a loss of joint sensation.

pseu·do·pa·ral·y·sis

(sū'dō-păr-al'i-sis)
Apparent paralysis due to voluntary inhibition of motion because of pain, to incoordination, or other cause, but without actual paralysis.
Synonym(s): pseudoparesis (1) .
References in periodicals archive ?
Brachial plexus injuries have a greater chance of association with clavicle and humerus fractures, as seen in our three cases of clavicle fracture with pseudoparalysis, probably because of similarities in the mechanism of all three injury types.8,12 Elective CS provides some protection but does not completely eliminate the risk of brachial plexus injury.10 Approximately 90% of brachial plexus injuries recover spontaneously, as was also seen in this study.20 Prognosis is excellent if antigravity movement of the biceps and shoulder abductor is present by three months of age.20 Initial treatment is normally conservative, and involves physical therapy with passive range-of-motion exercises.
Both pain and function are improved in cases of pseudoparalysis of forward flexion.
The diagnosis of BF was based on Pseudoparalysis, loss of continuity, tenderness, swelling, deformity and was confirmed by radiography of the affected extremity.
Neonatal osteitis may be undramatic and present with pseudoparalysis or failure to use a limb.
If it is just a temporary pseudoparalysis, you are making sure the animal doesn't get away.
Symptoms include rhinitis, jaundice, vesicular or bullous rash, hepatosplenomegaly, osteochondritis, pseudoparalysis, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, and hemolytic anemia.
Streptococcus, Staphylococcus or Haemophilus influenzae bacteria infecting the hip or knee can result in painful, localized pseudoparalysis.[8] Clinically, sepsis and warm, localized inflammation are the primary clues of septic arthritis.
Later clinical findings of congenital syphilis include frontal bossing, shortened maxillae and relative mandibular prominence, saddle nose deformity, high palatal arch, Hutchinson's teeth (dysmorphic upper central incisors), interstitial keratitis, mulberry (polycuspid first lower) molars, eighth nerve deafness, and saber shins and osteochondritis of long bones, which may lead to pseudoparalysis. (10,11,14)
Pseudoparalysis presenting in infants is a concerning symptom, where infection and trauma are the chief differentials.
In summary, subscapularis failure in aTSA is a significant problem and can result in instability, pseudoparalysis, and compromised glenoid component fixation due to uneven forces applied to the glenoid component.
([section]) Signs of CS (usually in an infant or child aged <2 years) include the following: condyloma lata, snuffles, syphilitic skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice from syphilitic hepatitis, pseudoparalysis, or edema (nephrotic syndrome and/or malnutrition).
Furthermore, a neonate or infant presenting with hip sepsis may not display the classic signs even on passive movement but display 'pseudoparalysis' only.