pseudomyopia


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pseu·do·my·o·pi·a

(sū'dō-mī-ō'pē-ă),
A condition simulating myopia and due to spasm of the ciliary muscle.

pseudomyopia

(soo″dō-mī-ō′pē-ă) [″ + myein, to shut, + ops, eye]
A condition in which defective vision causes persons to hold objects close in order to see them, even though myopia is not present.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some patients, usually related with high amounts of latent hyperopia, if the total amount of cycloplegic refraction is corrected, when the effect of the cycloplegic drugs ends, the eye tries to recover values close to its "altered tonic state" of accommodation, causing a pseudomyopia and patient discomfort.
Students focusing on screens or textbooks for a significant period of time are at risk of pseudomyopia, a temporary form of shortsightedness.
She said: "Students who focus intensely on screens and text books for a significant period of time are at risk of pseudomyopia - a temporary form of short-sightedness which causes blurry distance vision and can last for several days."
It is indicated that amisulpride might cause secondary pseudomyopia and supplementation of anticholinergic agent might contribute to this side effect.20 In a study done with schizophrenic patients using antipsychotics, abnormalities in the intraocular pressure and optical disc cavitation ratios have been determined in users of ziprasidone.
They are (1) accommodative insufficiency (AI), the most common finding; (2) accommodative excess (AE) or pseudomyopia; and (3) dynamic accommodative infacility.
Jones, "Physiological pseudomyopia," Optometry and Vision Science, vol.
It is indicated that amisulpride might cause secondary pseudomyopia and supplementation of anticholinetgic agent might be effective on this side effect.
In paresis diplopia occurs at any distance Convergence spasm Pseudomyopia Variable deviation exo.
Although accommodative insufficiency has been the most common accommodative abnormality studied in TBI [11], several authors have reported overaccommodation, also termed accommodative excess, pseudomyopia, or even frank "accommodative spasm" [6].
* In the presence of unstable esophoria, pseudomyopia and asthenopia