pseudologia fantastica


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pseudologia

 [soo″do-lo´je-ah]
lying; falsehood.
pseudologia fantas´tica a tendency to tell extravagant and fantastic falsehoods centered about the storyteller, who often comes to believe in and may act on them.

pseudologia fantastica

Pathological lying, usually for psychological reasons rather than for personal gain. The condition is considered to be a type of factitious disorder.
See also: pseudologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Pseudologia fantastica has sometimes been equated with malingering.
In addition, cases consistent with the phenomenology of pseudologia fantastica have been described with comorbid substance use disorder [9], developmental delay [10], gender disturbance [11], posttraumatic stress disorder [12], mood disorder [6], and personality disorder [6,13-15].
In summary, the chronic pattern of storytelling seen in pseudologia fantastica cannot be wholly accounted for by any single standard DSM 5 diagnosis and, in fact, may present in the context of multiple DSM 5 diagnoses.
Psychodynamic Understanding of Pseudologia Fantastica. In reviewing the case report literature on the subject [4, 6, 7, 9-15], we identified a compensatory enhancing of self-esteem in the face of shame as a common qualitative theme among many of the stories.
Pseudologia fantastica is a rare but dramatic clinical psychiatric presentation.
Udolisa, "Pseudologia fantastica: forensic and clinical treatment implications," Comprehensive Psychiatry, vol.
V Ford, "Pseudologia fantastica," Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, vol.
Because of an unstable self image, the pseudologia fantastica patient constantly battles to regulate his or her sense of self.
Pseudologia fantastica. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1988;77(1):1-6.
Pseudologia fantastica and factitious disorder: review of the literature and a case report.
Pseudologia fantastica: a consideration of "the lie" and a case presentation.
A review and case report of pseudologia fantastica. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology 2006;17(2):299-320.