pseudofolliculitis barbae


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pseudofolliculitis barbae

(soo?do-fo-lik'yu-lit-is bar'be) [ pseudo- + folliculitis + L. barba, beard]
Inflammation of beard follicles when tightly coiled hairs become ingrown. The only sure prevention is not shaving.
Synonym: razor bumps.illustration
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1-selling product in the world designed to treat pseudofolliculitis barbae, with more than 32 million units sold worldwide today.
Of course, many men have to put up with Pseudofolliculitis barbae, also called shaving bumps, while women are faced with razor drag and burns.
Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder in those of darker skin where the hair of the beard grows into the adjacent hair follicle and forms a small curled mass or aggregation of cells within the follicle.
Greyhound Lines involved a black male with the skin condition pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB), which predominantly affects black men and is severe enough to prevent shaving in approximately half of the group affected.
In each, black employees alleged that the requirement had a disparate impact because of pseudofolliculitis barbae, a bacterial disorder that causes men's faces to become infected if they shave and that disproportionately afflicts black men.
Other indications include ingrown hairs, pseudofolliculitis barbae, and pilonidal cysts.
The spiral hair is characteristic of the Congoids, the hair is straight in Mongoloids, and in the Caucasoids the hair may be straight, wavy or helical.3,9 Few elastic fibres anchor the hair follicles to the dermis in black skin; their hair is more susceptible to breakage and spontaneous knotting than the hair of fairer skin.1 The spiral hair of the Congoids has a tendency to develop pseudofolliculitis barbae and acne keloidalis.1,9 Traction alopecia, hot comb alopecia and follicular degeneration syndrome are common in Afro-Caribbean's because of their hair styling procedures.
A concern of many African-America men is pseudofolliculitis barbae, commonly known as razor bumps.
Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital and assistant clinical professor of dermatology, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY, said that the leading skin concerns in the darker-skinned patient population include acne, dyschromia (including hyper- and hypo-pigmentation) and pseudofolliculitis barbae (razor bumps).
It can also result from pseudofolliculitis barbae, which is more common in black than in white patients because of structural differences in the hair follicle and shaft.
1993) (explaining that employer's "no-beard policy" had a disparate impact on black males because of pseudofolliculitis barbae, a skin condition affecting African American men that makes shaving difficult, and was not justified by business necessity).
* New treatments for pseudofolliculitis barbae, or hair bumps.