pseudodementia

pseudodementia

 [soo″do-dĕ-men´shah]
a disorder resembling dementia but not due to organic brain disease and is potentially reversible by treatment; one form is the depressive symptoms seen in some older adults.

pseu·do·de·men·ti·a

(sū'dō-dē-men'shē-ă),
A condition resembling dementia but usually due to a depressive disorder rather than brain dysfunction.

pseudodementia

/pseu·do·de·men·tia/ (soo″do-dĕ-men´shah) a state of general apathy resembling dementia, but due to a psychiatric disorder rather than organic brain disease and potentially reversible.

pseudodementia

[-dimen′shə]
a syndrome that mimics dementia. It needs to be differentiated from depression.

pseudodementia

Neurology Dementia-like Sx due to psychologic impairment–eg, depression or histrionic episode, characterized by cognitive impairment of short duration, with preserved attention and ability to concentrate, and a variable performance in tests with similar levels of difficulty; it is often transient, common in the elderly and may be linked to medications–anticholinergics, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, butyrophenones, corticosteroids, digitalis, IMAOs, TCAs or due to depression–with physical and emotional deprivation, accompanied by apathy, akinesia and anxiety; pseudodementia also occurs in normal pressure hydrocephalus, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Huntington's, Parkinson's, Pick's, Wilson's diseases, and endocrinopathy. Cf Cerebral pseudoatrophy, Dementia.

pseu·do·de·men·ti·a

(sū'dō-dĕ-men'shē-ă)
A condition resembling dementia but usually due to a depressive disorder rather than brain dysfunction.

pseudodementia

Severe depression in an elderly person that mimics DEMENTIA. About 10% of those assumed to be demented are, in fact, suffering from a treatable depression that may respond well to antidepressant drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distinguishing between pseudodementia and true dementia can be challenging.
In the old days, we used to talk about this notion of pseudodementia, in which the more severe depression could give the appearance of cognitive impairment of dementia, but I think more recent longitudinal data suggest that depression can uncover or reveal an impending dementiform illness maybe 5 or 10 years before it clinically manifests.
9) Cognitive dysfunction in a depressed patient with MS might appear as pseudodementia, but other possible diagnoses include:
Ascertain the degree of cognitive impairment by administering the MMSE, [12] which was designed to distinguish dementia from depressive pseudodementia.
In cases of suspected dementia, SPECT is useful in differentiating between Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontal lobe dementia (FLD), vascular dementia (VaD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and pseudodementia (PSD) (Ishii et al.
Patients with dementia have significantly worse smooth-pursuit tracking movements than people with either pseudodementia or elderly normal controls.
It is well known that these medications may cause falls, delirium, and pseudodementia in the elderly.
Careful assessment of depression in the older adult is vital because pseudodementia is reversible with antidepressant therapy.
Patients categorized as "definite non-AD" were determined to have conditions that included age-related memory decline, pseudodementia due to depression, and metabolic disorders.