pseudobulbar palsy


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pseudobulbar palsy

paralysis of the lips and tongue, simulating progressive bulbar paralysis, but due to supranucelar lesions with bilateral involvement of the upper motor neurons; characterized by speech and swallowing difficulties, emotional instability, and spasmodic, mirthless laughter.

pseudobulbar palsy

Pseudobulbar paralysis, spastic bulbar paralysis A disease of middle age, characterized by bilateral spasticity of the facial and deglutitive muscles, resulting in dysarthria, dysphonia, dysphagia, drooling, facial weakness, hyperreflexia of extremities, and shuffling–parkinsonian gait; PP is remarkable for the variable psychiatric component, in which the Pts may have a flat affect–simulating apathy or severe depression, become enmeshed in trivialities, or have inappropriate responses to environmental cues, aka 'laughing sickness' for the characteristic pathologic–ie, inappropriate laughing–or crying Etiology Multifocal infarcts, often due to ASHD, but also to HTN, infections, trauma, degeneration Treatment Antibiotics Prognosis Guarded. Cf Bulbar palsy.

pseu·do·bul·bar pal·sy

(sū'dō-bŭl'bahr pawl'zē)
Spastic paralysis of the bulbar musculature due to bilateral impairment of corticobulbar upper motor neuron fibers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Foix-Chavany-Marie opercular syndrome is a severe form of pseudobulbar palsy caused by bilateral anterior opercular lesions (1,2).
Five patients suffered hypoxic ischaemic brain injury, two had left ventricular hypertrophy, one developed pseudobulbar palsy, and the other suffered renal failure.
Dysphagia, sometimes as part of pseudobulbar palsy, is one of the most common complications of stroke among patients.
It is an acute demyelinating condition primarily affecting central pons and commonly presenting clinically with spastic quadriparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, and altered mental status.
Box From Darwin to IEED, nomenclature has evolved over time Charles Darwin (5) was among the first to acknowledge the correlation between neurologic insult and dysregulated emotional expression, writing in 1872 that "certain brain disease, such as hemiplegia, brain-wasting, and senile decay, have a special tendency to induce weeping." In 1886, Oppenheim and Siemerling (6) proposed the terms "pseudobulbar affect" (PBA) and "pseudobulbar palsy" (a separate and distinct state that includes dyscontrol of facial muscles, resulting in dysarthria, dysphagia, and dysphonia) in their descriptions of patients with bilateral forebrain injury that appeared to mimic brainstem dysfunction.
In severe cases, there is spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy. This may evolve within 3-10 days into a locked-in-state (pseudo coma).
Examination showed the following striking findings: non-fatigable ophthalmoplegia and bilateral ptosis, and severe pseudobulbar palsy with a profoundly brisk jaw (and head) jerk.
Twenty-four hours post podophyllin ingestion, the child's GCS remained 5/15; however, he had now developed abnormal neurological signs, including hypotonia, areflexia with no clonus and reduced power in all limbs, but with no evidence of a pseudobulbar palsy. He had no signs of autonomic dysfunction; however, he did show deficits in sensation examination with loss of pain and touch.
Olszewsk, "Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, a heterogeneous degeneration involving the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebellum with vertical gaze and pseudobulbar palsy, nuchal dystonia and dementia," Archives of Neurology, vol.
The patients were having normal ICP with no pseudomeningocele formation and pseudobulbar palsy except CSF leak, observed in 3 patients.
Most patients have a family history of this disease, and it is clinically characterized by recurrent subcortical ischemic strokes, sometimes leading to pseudobulbar palsy and dementia.
Neurologic disorders such as Arnold-Chiari malformation, myotonic dystrophy, pseudobulbar palsy, pharyngeal paresis, myasthenia gravis, and neurofibromatosis