pseudoangina

pseudoangina

 [soo″do-an-ji´-nah]
a nervous disorder resembling angina, consisting of slight chest or breast pain, usually with pallor followed by cyanosis and coldness or numbness of the extremities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·gi·na pec·to·ris va·so·mo·to·ri·a

angina pectoris in which the breast pain is comparatively slight, but pallor followed by cyanosis, and coldness and numbness of the extremities are marked.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pseudoangina

(soo″dō-ăn′jĭ-nă) (-ăn-jī′nă) [″ + L. angina, a choking]
Chest pain in patients who have healthy coronary arteries. The syndrome may be caused by esophageal, peptic, gallbladder, musculoskeletal, pulmonary, pleural, or psychogenic illnesses.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(75, 76) Other symptoms are Raynaud's syndrome, (75, 76) positional ischemia or venous insufficiency, (69, 72, 77-80) which may contribute to intracranial hypertension83 and migraines in addition it may present as digital sensory loss, (72) hand sweating and coldness, (98-99, 107-108) secondary dysautonomia such as atrial fibrillation and vasoconstriction, (81, 98-103) deep vein thrombosis (DVT) development, (79, 88-93) weakness of the extremities, chest pain and pseudoangina, (69-71, 88-90) subclavian artery injuries with subsequent embolus (73, 96) which may lead to retrograde thromboembolism with sequelar stroke, (91-93, 97, 98) and more.
The symptoms vary widely and include pain in the upper limb and shoulder, paresthesia, muscle weakness, claudication or pseudoangina phenomena, Paget-Schroetter syndrome or thrombosis of the subclavian vein, Raynaud's syndrome, and occasionally dermal trophic disorders, ischemia, and gangrene.
(28) Similarly, the evaluation of costovertebral joints is also imperative since they often may be the etiologic source of anterior chest pain as in cases of pseudoangina. (11) While previously reported as self-limiting in nature that generally resolves within one year, usual medical management has generally consisted of relative rest for 4-6 weeks.