pseudoaddiction

A drug-seeking behaviour that simulates true addiction, which occurs in patients with pain who are receiving inadequate pain medication
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pseudoaddiction

Substance abuse A drug-seeking behavior that stimulates true addiction in Pts with pain who are receiving inadequate.
pain, medication. Cf Addiction, Drug-seeking.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The defendants used the phrase 'pseudoaddiction' to convince doctors that patients who exhibited signs of addiction...
(73) However, before OxyContin obtained FDA approval in 1995, (74) "many physicians were reluctant to prescribe [opioid pain relievers] on a long-term basis for common chronic conditions" due to "concerns about addiction, tolerance, and physiological dependence." (75) To topple physicians' opiophobia, Purdue developed an idea called "pseudoaddiction," commissioning its "physician-spokespersons" to sell the term to medical communities in order to artificially differentiate and render "clinically unimportant" the "physical dependence" on opioids from drug addiction.
One study showed that pseudoaddiction can adversely influence pain management, and suggest that more emphasis should be placed on patients' pain and analgesic needs when responding to concern-raising behaviors problems in SCD.
Physical dependence, pseudoaddiction and addiction can result in patients seeking medications in improper ways.
Pseudoaddiction occurs when individuals demonstrate some behaviors associated with addiction.
The production of a distinction between types of drug-dependent people is also fostered by the concept of pseudoaddiction. The notion of pseudoaddiction was developed in pain medicine to describe the desperate drug seeking of the undertreated pain patient and to distinguish it from the desperate drug seeking of the addict.
For patients with PTSD and chronic pain, it is also important to differentiate between opioid use disorder and pseudoaddiction. The difference has clear treatment implications for pain management and substance abuse treatment.
Pseudoaddiction results from undertreatment of pain, and may resolve with proper therapy.
(14) These behaviors may be related to desperation over uncontrolled pain (so-called "pseudoaddiction," characterized by aberrant drug-related behaviors that improve when pain control improves) or an alternative psychiatric diagnosis, such as an anxiety disorder or personality disorder.
The physician must be well conversant with the differential diagnosis and definitions of physical dependence, tolerance, pseudotolerance, aberrant behaviors, addiction, and pseudoaddiction. No specific opioid drug is intrinsically "better" than the others are.