pseudoachalasia

pseudoachalasia

(sood?o-a?ka-la'zh(e-)a) [ pseudo- + achalasia]
Difficulty passing food from the esophagus to the stomach not caused by a primary disorder of the swallowing muscles but attributable to another disease such as a mass in the esophagus or a nerve disease affecting lower esophageal motility.
Synonym: secondary achalasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Secondary achalasia or pseudoachalasia is a term used to describe acquired esophageal/ motor abnormalities that are similar to primary achalasia.
(12) Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is also used to identify the condition but its use is mainly to identify cases of pseudoachalasia due to malignancy.
Upper GI endoscopy has been primarily used to identify pseudoachalasia. (13)
Pyloric outlet obstruction can occur with tumors of the antrum and pylorus, and tumors of the cardia can cause dysphagia due to involvement of the lower esophageal sphincter and development of pseudoachalasia. The physical examination is usually unremarkable.
Overinflation of the band can result in obstructive symptoms with pseudoachalasia seen on UGI series (Figure 12).
Additionally, upper endoscopy (EGD) was performed to rule out masses and pseudoachalasia. This study revealed evidence of a significantly dilated proximal esophagus with some residual liquid material in proximal esophagus.
Endoscopic evaluation is recommended for most patients with achalasia, primarily to exclude malignancies at the esophagogastric junction that can mimic primary achalasia clinically, radiographically, and manometrically (so called "pseudoachalasia").
(3) A more rapid onset and progression of symptoms (less than 6 months) is suggestive of pseudoachalasia and cancer.
In pseudoachalasia, oesophageal motor dysfunction is not caused by a primary denervation disorder but rather by neoplasm or postoperative obstruction of the oesophagogastric junction.
Pseudoachalasia, a condition caused by tumors, often is mistakenly identified as esophageal achalasia based on clinical symptoms.
Proximal tumors may cause dysphagia or pseudoachalasia, while distal tumors may result in symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction.
Secondary achalasia (also known as pseudoachalasia) is caused by a malignant tumor at the gastroesophageal junction, (18-23) or, less commonly, by benign conditions such as Chagas' disease.