pseudallescheriasis

pseud·al·les·che·ri·a·sis

(sūd'al-es-kĕ-rī'ă-sis),
A variety of clinical diseases resulting from infection with Pseudallescheria boydii; for example, bronchial colonization, and invasive pneumonitis, as well as mycotic keratitis, endophthalmitis, endocarditis, meningitis, sinusitis, brain abscesses, cutaneous and subcutaneous infections, and disseminated systemic infections.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pseud·al·les·che·ri·a·sis

(sūd'ăl-es'kĕ-rī'ă-sis)
A variety of clinical diseases resulting from infection with Pseudallescheria boydii (e.g., pulmonary colonization, fungoma, and invasive pneumonitis), as well as mycotic keratitis, endophthalmitis, endocarditis, meningitis, sinusitis, brain abscesses, cutaneous and subcutaneous infections, and disseminated systemic infections.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Itraconazole is the drug of choice for uncommon IFI like mild/moderate coccidioidomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, sporotrichosis, and pseudallescheriasis. Some studies show that it may be used for mild aspergillosis disease.
Voriconazole is the preferred therapy for aspergillosis, scedosporiosis, fusariosis, and pseudallescheriasis and alternative therapy for candidiasis.
Here, we are reporting an unusual case of invasive pulmonary pseudallescheriasis in an immunocompetent host in association with a long term history of occupational exposure to cow dung .
Pseudallescheria boydii brain abscess successfully treated with voriconazole and surgical drainage: case report and literature review of central nervous system pseudallescheriasis. Clin Infect Dis.
(from Pseudallescheriasis as an Aggressive Opportunistic Infection in a Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient--Nonaka et al) Answers to this month's questions: 1, False.
However, an increasing number of cases of disseminated pseudallescheriasis has been observed in immunocompromised patients due to increased incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection, antineoplastic or immunosuppressive medication, and bone marrow or solid organ transplantation.
However, the use of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive or antineoplastic medication, bone marrow or solid organ transplantation, and human immunodeficiency virus infection have increased the occurrence of disseminated pseudallescheriasis. (3,4,6,7) The portal of entry could be lung, paranasal sinuses, or skin by traumatic inoculation.