prurigo


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prurigo

 [proo-ri´go]
any of several itchy skin eruptions in which the characteristic lesion is dome-shaped with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting or lichenification. adj., adj prurig´inous.
prurigo gestatio´nis (prurigo gestationis of Besnier) an extremely pruritic condition of unknown etiology occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, characterized by the development of tiny crust-covered excoriated papules mainly on the extensor surfaces of the limbs but also found on the upper trunk and other areas of the body, and leaving a postinflammatory residue on resolution of the lesions. It tends to clear after delivery and to recur with subsequent pregnancies.
prurigo mi´tis prurigo of a mild type.
prurigo nodula´ris a form of neurodermatitis, usually occurring on the extremities in middle-aged women, marked by discrete, firm, rough-surfaced, dark brownish-gray, intensely itchy nodules.
prurigo sim´plex papular urticaria.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pru·ri·go

(prū-rī'gō),
A chronic disease of the skin marked by a persistent eruption of papules that itch intensely.
[L. itch, fr. prurio, to itch]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

prurigo

(pro͝o-rī′gō)
n.
A chronic skin disease having various causes, marked by the eruption of pale, dome-shaped papules that itch severely.

pru·rig′i·nous (-rĭj′ə-nəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pru·ri·go

(prū-rī'gō)
A chronic disease of the skin marked by a persistent eruption of papules that itch intensely.
[L. itch, fr. prurio, to itch]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

prurigo

A widespread, itchy skin rash sometimes secondary to constant scratching but often of no obvious local cause.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about prurigo

Q. Does anybody know what can be done about a very itchy red rash on ones' toes which comes back every few months I've used different sorts of creams such as Lamasil. It's really bothering me and I'd love to get a few directions before I give up and go see a doctor.

A. Sounds like 'Athletes foot'. Here is a website that lists some remedies for it:
http://www.sanjuanregional.com/index.cfm/fa/category.display/category_id/223/Athlete's_Foot.cfm

More discussions about prurigo
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References in periodicals archive ?
Most patients lack associated pruritis which is in contrast to prurigo pigmentosa.
"While there are several topical and systemic treatments available to treat prurigo pigmentosa, we treated the young man with a simplistic yet effective dietary plan that also included carbohydrates.
Subsequent histologic examination identified it as prurigo nodularis (Figure 2).
The overall incidence of papulonodular lesions of skin is leprosy (22.67%), erythema nodosum leprosum (20%), cutaneous tuberculosis and trichoepithelioma (8% each), Prurigo Nodularis, actinomycosis and epidermoid cyst (6.67% each), syringoma and granuloma Annulare (5.33% each), basal cell carcinoma and Jessner lymphocytic infiltrate (4% each), and metastatic carcinoma (2.67%).
In the second category we find chronic dermatological diseases, such as: psoriasis, acne excoriee, alopecia, atopic dermatitis, chronic forms of urticaria, endogenous eczema, prurigo nodularis, Darier's disease, lichen simplex chronicus, recidivant herpes simplex infection etc.
He took one look and said: "It's Nodular Prurigo and it is one of the worst cases I have seen.
Abstract Strophulus prurigo, chronic skin disease widespread in Africa in general and the Congo - Brazzaville in particular is studied here in a neighborhood of the city of Brazzaville located near a watercourse.
Other cutaneous features which were less frequent findings included palmar erythema, clubbing, leuconychia, spider naevi, alopecia areata, prurigo nodularis, porphyria cutanea tarda, erythema nodosum, sjorgens syndrome, vitiligo and cryoglobulinemia.
A"Prurigo" describes the changes that appear in the skin after it has itched and been scratched for a long time.
Five (2.5%) patients had prurigo of pregnancy, 4 (2%) had dermatoses associated with Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP), 3 (1.5%) patients had polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, and 1 (0.5%) patient had pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy.