prunasin

prunasin

a cyanogenetic glycoside found in the seeds, and to a less extent in the foliage, of plants of the Rosaceae family.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
maculata were assumed to be caused by pinoresinol and its glucoside, prunasin, catalpol and two sesquiterpenes.
In Prunus, enzymes associated with this activity include amygdalin hydrolase, prunasin hydrolase, and mandelonitrile lyase (Swain et al.
Isolation and characterization of multiple forms of prunasin hydrolase from black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.
Graham CJ Non-structural carbohydrate and prunasin composition of peach seedlings fertilized with different nitrogen source and aluminum.
nutans the cyanogenic glucoside prunasin [13] as well as some valerolactones such as parasorbic acid and 5-methyl-3a-hydroxyvalerolactone [14].
It also contains the enzyme emulsin which in the presence of water acts on soluble glycosides amygdalin and prunasin [13] yielding glucose cyanide and the essential oil of bitter almonds which is nearly pure benzaldehyde.
Peach rootstock differences in ring nematode tolerance related to effects on tree dry weight, carbohydrates, and prunasin contents.
To briefly summarize information about amygdalin and nitrilosides, the following is offered: Amygdalin is one of many nitriloside compounds, which are natural cyanide-containing substances found in many foods, including all of the seeds of the prunasin family (apricots, peaches, apples, pears, and others), millet, buckwheat, cassava melons, and many others.
The first pathway was described as "first pass" metabolism of amygdalin to prunasin (D-mandelonitrile [beta]- D -glucoside) by cleavage of the terminal glucose residue via enzymatic [beta](1-6)-glucosidase activity in the proximal small intestine.
Majak and Cheng (1984, 1987) demonstrated that many ruminal bacteria have the ability to release free cyanide from the glycosides amygdalin (laetrile), prunasin, and linamarin (cyanogenic glucosides in cassava).