prudent diet


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prudent diet

A diet to protect against heart disease, stroke, and other common diseases. It consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, fish, and low-fat dairy products rather than refined or processed foods, red meats, high concentrated sweets, eggs, and butter. A multistep approach decreases fat, cholesterol, and protein.
See also: diet
References in periodicals archive ?
Without taking diet beverage consumption into account, people who ate the prudent diet had significantly better cholesterol and triglyceride profiles and significantly lower risks of hypertension and metabolic syndrome than those who ate the western diet.
Fourth, they make no reference to the Estrogenic Replacement and Atherosclerosis (ERA) Trial, [6] which found that coronary atherosclerosis progressed significantly more rapidly over a 3-year period in postmenopausal women eating the equivalent of the WHIDMT low-fat prudent diet than it did in those eating a diet high in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates and polyunsaturated fats.
7,8] Thus, the prudent diet is not the equal of the low-carbohydrate diet for those with insulin resistance.
The UCLA Prudent Diet Trial on men lasted eight years with the following results:
He was a champion of breastfeeding, electrolyte-balanced rehydration, the prudent diet, exercise and the pivotal role of parents' love and stimulation in the treatment and raising of healthy children.
Fortunately we now appreciate that these practices are harmful and that the bowel with its various active cells and chemicals and its mucus-lined walls is an exquisite processor of food and rarely needs help other than a prudent diet.
However, people who live on prudent diets all their lives are likely to have better health outcomes.
The results: Men who ate a lot of red meat, processed meat, refined grains, and sweets were 64% more likely to develop heart disease than men with the most prudent diets.
Innumerable observational, epidemiologic, and transcultural studies indicate that comparably prudent diets help control weight, prevent chronic disease, and promote health.
Cardiovascular disease risk factors in free-living men: comparison of two prudent diets, one based on lactoovovegetarianism and the other allowing lean meat.