prudent diet


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prudent diet

A diet to protect against heart disease, stroke, and other common diseases. It consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, fish, and low-fat dairy products rather than refined or processed foods, red meats, high concentrated sweets, eggs, and butter. A multistep approach decreases fat, cholesterol, and protein.
See also: diet
References in periodicals archive ?
Going from low %FFO (-1 SD) to high %FFO (+1 SD) exposure was associated with a 0.32 decrease in predicted prudent diet score (range of scores: -2.87 to 2.28).
Western dietary pattern was similar to the dietary pattern defined in an earlier study in Karachi,15 while prudent diet was similar to the patterns generated from INTERHEART, Health Professional Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Cohort.3,14,16 High loading of eggs in the combination diet in the present study is, however different from the afore-mentioned research studies because eggs have been part of the western diet in those studies.
The prudent diet of low fat, high fiber, moderate fish and a high content of fruits and vegetables warrants more accolades for heart healthy practices.
A prudent diet is essentially the same diet that is recommended for any adult who has had a heart attack or is at risk for a heart attack.
The prudent diet was characterized as being high in produce, poultry, and fish, while the Western diet was characterized as being high meat, fat, refined carbohydrate, and dessert.
In contrast, there was no association between the prudent diet and risk of cancer recurrence or cancer mortality.
The study pitted those who ate a "prudent diet" that included more produce, fish and legumes against those with a "Western diet" of more meat, desserts and French fries.
Avoid being overweight; follow a prudent diet; and incorporate physical activity into your daily life, as this helps you avoid disorders of the blood fats, development of diabetes or pre-diabetes, and the onset or aggravation of high blood pressure.
(15) The Lyon Diet Heart Study demonstrated the superiority of advice targeting a Mediterranean-style cuisine over advice to follow a prudent diet, (16) with recognition that beneficial changes can be made to usual diets and proven to be lasting (in this case, at four-year follow up).
Macadamia nuts, when included in a prudent diet, can decrease low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol) levels, and they should be included among nuts with qualified health claims.