prudence


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prudence

See Reasonable prudence.
References in classic literature ?
For a few years Marmaduke directed the commercial operations of his house with a prudence and sagacity that afforded rich returns.
The world of the senses is a world of shows; it does not exist for itself, but has a symbolic character; and a true prudence or law of shows recognizes the co-presence of other laws and knows that its own office is subaltern; knows that it is surface and not centre where it works.
The world is filled with the proverbs and acts and winkings of a base prudence, which is a devotion to matter, as if we possessed no other faculties than the palate, the nose, the touch, the eye and ear; a prudence which adores the Rule of Three, which never subscribes, which never gives, which seldom lends, and asks but one question of any project,--Will it bake bread?
The true prudence limits this sensualism by admitting the knowledge of an internal and real world.
On the other hand, nature punishes any neglect of prudence.
We must call the highest prudence to counsel, and ask why health and beauty and genius should now be the exception rather than the rule of human nature?
Whilst something higher than prudence is active, he is admirable; when common sense is wanted, he is an encumbrance.
There is nothing he will not be the better for knowing, were it only the wisdom of Poor Richard, or the State-Street prudence of buying by the acre to sell by the foot; or the thrift of the agriculturist, to stick a tree between whiles, because it will grow whilst he sleeps; or the prudence which consists in husbanding little strokes of the tool, little portions of time, particles of stock and small gains.
The prudence which secures an outward well-being is not to be studied by one set of men, whilst heroism and holiness are studied by another, but they are reconcilable.
So, in regard to disagreeable and formidable things, prudence does not consist in evasion or in flight, but in courage.
She was quite a different person from the haughty, shy, dissatisfied little girl whom we have known previously, and this change of temper proved great prudence, a sincere desire of amendment, or at any rate great moral courage on her part.
But by marriages of prudence we mean those in which both parties have sown their wild oats already.