proxy directive


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proxy directive

(prok′sē)
A form of advanced directive that specifies the person or persons who have power of attorney to make health care decisions for the patient if he or she is no longer competent to make choices.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instruction (or treatment) directives state the individual's wishes, while proxy directives name a person to act on the individual's behalf to make health care decisions for the individual in the event that he or she becomes incapacitated.[3] The most familiar and well-recognized form of advance directive (a treatment directive), is the living will.
These are both instruction directives, which provide detailed information and anticipate various scenarios, as well as proxy directives, which name an individual who should make medical care decisions.[3] (See Table 7.) State statutes differ substantially in this regard, so it is important to research them.
States have enacted laws that give legal recognition to "living wills" -- instruction directives and proxy directives -- yet people are not required to have them.
Other advance directives, usually called "proxy directives," are intended to designate another person to make health care decisions on the behalf of the document's adult signer should that individual later become nonautonomous or legally incompetent.