surface

(redirected from proximal surface)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

surface

 [sur´fas]
the outer part or external aspect of a solid body; called also facies.
buccal surface the vestibular surface of the molars and premolars, which faces the cheek.
contact surface proximal surface.
distal surface the surface of a tooth that is farthest from the midline of the dental arch, opposite to its mesial surface.
facial surface vestibular surface.
incisal surface the cutting edges of the anterior teeth, the incisors and canines, which come into contact with those of the opposite teeth during protrusive occlusion. See also occlusal surface.
labial surface the vestibular surface of the incisors and canines, which faces the lips.
lingual surface the surface of a tooth that faces inward toward the tongue and oral cavity, opposite the vestibular surface; called also oral surface.
masticatory surface occlusal surface.
mesial surface the surface of a tooth that is closest to the midline of the dental arch, opposite to its distal surface.
occlusal surface the surface of the teeth that comes in contact with those of the opposite jaw during occlusion; called also masticatory surface.
oral surface lingual surface.
proximal surface (proximate surface) the area where the mesial surface of one tooth touches the distal surface of another; called also contact area or surface.
vestibular surface the surface of a tooth that is directed outward toward the vestibule of the mouth, opposite to the lingual surface; see also buccal surface and labial surface. Called also facial surface.

sur·face

(sŭr'făs), [TA]
The outer part of any solid.
Synonym(s): face (2) [TA], facies (2) [TA]
[F. fr. L. superficius, see superficial]

surface

adjective Superficial.
 
verb The outer part of a solid structure.

surface

adjective Superficial verb Vox populi The outer part of a solid structure. See Working surface.

sur·face

(sŭr'făs) [TA]
The outer part of any solid.
See: superficial
Synonym(s): facies (2) [TA] , face (2) .
[F. fr. L. superficius]

sur·face

(sŭr'făs) [TA]
Outer part of any solid or liquid at point of liquid-air interface.
Synonym(s): face (3) , facies (2) .
[F. fr. L. superficius]

Patient discussion about surface

Q. I located a lump on the surface of my right underarm. I think I am showing some signs of breast cancer. I am 27 years old working lady. I think I am showing some signs of breast cancer. I located a lump on the surface of my right underarm. This lump is of a cherry size and does not pain at all. But I do have pain in my breast. I had my mammogram done which showed no lump and my doctor says that there is nothing to worry and she has given me some medicines. I want to know that if everything is normal then how come these lumps came.

A. there are ways to diagnose if lumps are breast cancer or not. a lump under the forearm can be a sign of an advanced stage of cancer, but it can also mean some kind of viral infection that caused a lymph node to swell up. so if a doctor told you it's fine- he probably checked it out, and it's fine. if you still anxious - go get a second opinion.

More discussions about surface
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of a CBCT (NewTom 9000), a limited CBCT (LCBCT) (Accu-i-Tomo) and a storage phosphor plate (SPP) (Digora Optime) imaging systems in assessing the depths of mechanically created defects with different shapes and depths on the proximal surfaces of extracted teeth.
Similar constructions are seen in monoplastidic meiosis of mosses and hornworts as microtubules emanate from plastids as well as the proximal surfaces of nuclei.
The Pearson Correlation Coefficient between measurements of buccal/ palatal and proximal surfaces was 0.35 and 0.05 in the groups treated with alcohol, in sites with or without ligature, respectively.
(1,6) The absence of biological spacing between the proximal surfaces of the primary molars is associated with higher caries prevalence.
Two hundred sixteen proximal surfaces were evaluated for the presence and severity of carious lesions on bitewing-simulated projections using D-speed film/circular, E-speed film/rectangular, and E-speed film/circular collimation.
In 2003, there were fewer caries-free adolescents and also more individuals with initial and manifest carious lesions and restorations on proximal surfaces, among individuals in the F cohort compared with individuals in the S cohort (Figure 1).
The most common sites for caries to occur are pits and fissure and proximal surfaces.3 These areas are more difficult to clean and thus more prone to caries.
The curved proximal surfaces of the contacting teeth roll away from the contact area at all points, occlusally or incisally, labially or buccally and lingually and cervically, and the embrasures and interproximal spaces are continuous, as they surrounds the area of contact.
The two largest brushes are for spaces where a tooth or several teeth have been lost, leaving the adjacent proximal surfaces difficult to clean with a traditional brush.
* Proximal surfaces were affected more in first than in second molars,
(14) Toothbrush studies report more plaque removal from buccal and lingual surfaces than proximal surfaces, and from more anterior surfaces than posterior surfaces.
The proximal contact or contact area refers to the surface where the proximal surfaces of neighboring teeth come in contact.6 Failure to obtain ideal contact usually results in food impaction into the interproxi- mal space, resulting in trauma to periodontium, in- flammation, pain and bone loss.7 Different contact forming instruments and matrix systems are cur- rently being used to ideally reproduce contact point for proximal composite restorations.