proxemics

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Related to proxemic: paralinguistic, kinesic

prox·em·ics

(prok-sem'iks),
The scientific discipline concerned with the various aspects of urban overcrowding.
[L. proximus, nearest, next]

proxemics

(prŏk-sē′mĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the cultural, behavioral, and sociological aspects of spatial distances between individuals.

prox·e′mic adj.

proxemics

[proksē′miks]
Etymology: L, proximus, nearest
the study of spatial distances between people and their effect on interpersonal behavior, especially in relation to population density, placement of people within an area, territoriality, personal space, and the opportunity for privacy.
The formal study of the effects of the 'sphere of space'—i.e., the distance separating one person from another—which dictates the way in which we react with each other
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the first image that the spectator glimpses of the grandfather portrays him with authority both from his physical attributes and camera proxemics.
A proxemic classification system for describing distance zones according to social relationships that were common to American middle class adults, was developed by Hall in 1976.
10) See Hall (1963) for his theory of proxemics that argues that human perceptions of space are molded and patterned by culture.
For example, they can use appropriate kinesic (body movements) and proxemic (relative distance) aspects of the language and culture.
1979) (discussing the similarities and differences in cross-cultural nonverbal behavior); see also MEHRABIAN, supra note 111, at 6-7 (discussing several studies finding that people of different cultures have diverging expectations and preferences for proxemic behavior).
Questions that Hall raised (1963) when he began studying proxemic behavior included:
costume and make-up, moral attitudes, politeness, proxemic and kinesic elements .
The hug is introduced as a kinesic sign, which starts as gestural and then becomes proxemic.
6) Although Shakespeare depicts a form of single combat between Hal and Hotspur that is far removed from the early modern duel of honor, Low argues that the combatants' remarks about one another "manifest the same sense about proxemic penetration" (92) as contemporary manuals and accounts of fencing.
A stage differs from real life in a way that is essentially proxemic.
For a study of the huge variety of verbal, nonverbal, and proxemic cues that people use to negotiate identity in the workplace, see Sherry M.
The purpose of this study was to contribute to the existing literature on sex differences in proxemic behavior.