provitamin


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Related to provitamin: Prooxidant, provitamin A carotenoids

provitamin

 [pro-vi´tah-min]
a substance, e.g., ergosterol, from which the animal organism can form a vitamin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·vi·ta·min

(prō-vī'tă-min),
A substance that can be converted into a vitamin; for example, β-carotene.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

provitamin

(prō-vī′tə-mĭn)
n.
A vitamin precursor that the body converts to its active form through normal metabolic processes. Carotene, for example, is a provitamin of vitamin A.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pro·vi·ta·min

(prō'vī'tă-min)
An inactive form of a vitamin that needs activation before it can be used by the body.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

provitamin

A substance that is converted in the body to a VITAMIN.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

pro·vi·ta·min

(prō'vī'tă-min)
An inactive form of a vitamin that needs activation before it can be used by the body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixteen different provitamin A biofortified maize hybrids were introduced and evaluated at University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan in collaboration with International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)-Pakistan under USAID-funded Agricultural Innovation Program (AIP) for Pakistan.
PROVITAMIN A RETENTION IN BIOFORTFIED CROPS IN AFRICA
Although it is a derivative of Vitamin B5, pathenol is considered a provitamin of pantothenic acid and alcohol.
Compared to a tomato sauce meal without avocado, the addition of oneavocado (150 g), more than quadrupled (4.6 times) the conversion of provitamin A to vitamin A.
This means that both melons appear to be comparable sources of dietary provitamin A for humans, on par with carrots, which are known to be a major source of provitamin A.
Carrots contain beta-carotene, also known as provitamin A, not preformed vitamin A.
Poor diets may also contain few fruits and a limited variety of vegetables and, therefore, low amounts of B-carotene (provitamin A), folic acid, and vitamin C.
Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are now used in the production of pharmaceutical drugs, gene therapy, and golden rice (containing provitamin A).
The provitamin A was calculated according to the new conversion factor (IOM, 2001), in which 12 [micro]g of [beta]-carotene and 24 [micro]g of [alpha]-carotene, [alpha]-cryptoxanthin and [beta]-cryptoxanthin correspond to 1 RAE (retinol activity equivalent).
The micronutrient with provitamin A activity occurs naturally in carrots.
By combining colour, ProVitamin A activity and antioxidant properties, CaroCare Nat.
The soft lens, all-in-one solution, contains carnosine, an antioxidant that supports the natural defence mechanism of the cornea against harmful free radicals and Provitamin B5 (Dexpanthenol) which cares, supports and protects regeneration of damaged corneal cells.