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praseodymium

 (Pr) [pra″ze-o-dim´e-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 59, atomic weight 140.907. (See Appendix 6.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

PR

Abbreviation for per rectum.

Pr

1. Abbreviation for presbyopia.
2. Symbol for praseodymium; propyl.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

PR

Abbreviation for:
P receptor
pagetoid reticulosis
palindromic rheumatoid arthritis
pars recta
partial remission
partial resection
partial response
penicillin resistant
per rectum  
performance ratings  
perfusion rate
peripheral resistance
pharmaceutical representative
phenol red
phosphorylation rate
photoreactive repair
photoreceptor
physical rehabilitation
pityriasis rosea
placental retention
polymorphic reticulosis
polymyalgia rheumatica
poor responder
post-resuscitation
pregnancy rate
prevalence rate
primary response
primitive reflexes
production rate
progesterone receptor 
proliferation rate
proline rich
prolonged release
propranolol
prospective reimbursement
protein restriction
protein retention
public relations 
pulmonary regurgitation
pulmonary resistance
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

PR

1. Partial remission/response.
2. Peer review, see there.
3. Per rectum.
4. Peripheral resistance.
5. Progesterone receptor, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

PR

Abbreviation for per rectum.

Pr

Abbreviation for propyl; praseodymium; presbyopia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first dictionary of proverbs ever written in Urdu.
It is as well vital to be mindful that the same proverb is used to evaluate the character of Ndyire, presenting him as one who lacks ubuntu/unhu, which accentuates that one is expected to treat others with reverence because they are fellow human beings.
As such, the European proverbs he juxtaposes with Setswana ones are semantically in agreement with one another, probably in the wisdom and philosophical outlooks that the proverb pairs appear to convey.
Though some called it a "fake proverb," others tried to find out which proverb or idiom Ivanka intended to use.
The idea behind her master's research was to explore the possibility of using manga as a technique to present known Saudi proverbs, and to introduce manga as an art and tool that can be used to reflect Saudi identity and promote the Kingdom's culture.
Another commendable characteristic is the way proverbs have been explained both in conversational Hindko and simple Urdu.
His steadfastness is targeted in other proverb through his tail.
Renowned expert Wolfgang Mieder spoke with DW's Kate ME-ser about what differentiates a proverb from a slogan and why his very favorite English expression would never work in German.
If we question the proverb "He who steals an egg today, tomorrow will steal an ox," we will have to discover in which type of context, either cultural or historical, it has been created.
Given the wealth of scholarship on the concept of wyrd (e.g., Phillpotts 1928; Timmer 1941; Kasik 1979; Weil 1989; Pollack 2006) and Old English maxims (e.g., Williams 1914; Cavill 1993, 1999; Deskis 1996, 2005, 2013; Shippey 1977, 1978; Thayer 2003; Kramer 2010; O'Camb 2013), this proverb has enjoyed considerable scholarly attention.
(Proverbs 22:10 NIV) Drive out the mocker, and out goes strife; quarrels and insults are ended' came to mind.
Compiled and translated by Haiwang Yuan, "Becoming a Dragon: Forty Chinese Proverbs", is a bilingual (English-Chinese) collection showcasing proverbs, popular phrases, and two-part allegorical sayings.