proton pump


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pump

 [pump]
1. an apparatus for drawing or forcing liquid or gas.
2. to draw or force liquids or gases.
blood pump a machine used to propel blood through the tubing of extracorporeal circulation devices.
breast pump a pump for taking milk from the breast.
calcium pump the mechanism of active transport of calcium (Ca2+) across a membrane, as of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, against a concentration gradient; the mechanism is driven by hydrolysis of ATP.
enteral feeding pump an infusion pump specifically designed for administration of a solution through a feeding tube.
insulin pump see insulin pump.
intra-aortic balloon pump see intra-aortic balloon pump.
muscle pump compression of veins by the contraction of skeletal muscles, forcing blood towards the heart against the flow of gravity; seen particularly in the deep veins of the lower limbs. Called also venous pump.
proton pump a system for transporting protons across cell membranes, often exchanging them for other positively charged ions.
sodium pump (sodium-potassium pump) the mechanism of active transport driven by the energy generated by Na+,K+-ATPase, by which sodium (Na+) is extruded from a cell and potassium (K+) is brought in, so as to maintain the low concentration of sodium and the high concentration of potassium within the cell with respect to the surrounding medium. A high concentration of intracellular potassium is necessary for vital processes such as protein biosynthesis, certain enzyme activities, and maintenance of the membrane potential of excitable cells. Called also Na+-K+ pump.
stomach pump see stomach pump.
venous pump muscle pump.

pro·ton pump

molecular mechanism for the net transport of protons across a membrane; usually involves the activity of an ATPase.

proton pump

An ATP-dependent H+ ion transporter present in the membranes of lysosomes and vacuoles, which maintains a low pH (4.5-5.0) inside these organelles. Proton pumping is also required in the electron transport chain, where an NADH (or FADH) is oxidised to NAD+ (or FAH+), releasing 2 electrons and a proton.

pro·ton pump

(prō'ton pŭmp)
Molecular mechanism for the net transport of protons across a membrane; usually involves the activity of adenosine triphosphatase.

proton pump

a specialized assembly of proteins in a cell membrane which transports protons against a concentration gradient.

proton

an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.

proton pump
see sodium pump.
proton pump inhibitor
a class of therapeutic agents which are used to counteract the effects of proton pumps in tissues and organs, particularly used in counteracting gastric hypersecretion and acidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Should you recommend a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to decrease the likelihood of a future upper GI bleed?
The use of proton pump inhibitors is associated with anemia in cardiovascular out patients.
The above approval was made based on the results of a double-blind controlled Phase III clinical study conducted in Japan, in which the efficacy and safety of twice-daily dosing of Pariet 10 mg Tablets were evaluated against once-daily dosing of Pariet 10 mg Tablets in patients with reflux esophagitis who had inadequate response to existing treatment with proton pump inhibitors.
Proton pump inhibitors: Are we still prescribing them without valid indications?
This article will make some suggestions about protecting renal function as we age, and what those who suffer gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) should change in light of the disturbing findings about proton pump inhibitors.
Proton pump inhibitors have several long-term consequences that most people have the good sense to want to avoid.
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most widely used agents for suppression of gastric acid in patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and erosive esophagitis.
Proton pump inhibitor treatment partially reversed these changes in patients with PPRE but showed no effect for patients with EoE.
Overutilization of proton pump inhibitors: What the clinician needs to know.
Patients with acid reflux and Barrett's esophagus may need to take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) such as omeprazole twice a day if they are still experiencing symptoms with just a single daily dose.
Recent advances in proton pump inhibitors and management of acid-peptic disorders.