proton


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proton

 [pro´ton]
an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.

pro·ton (p),

(prō'ton),
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1 the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton

/pro·ton/ (pro´ton) an elementary particle that is the core or nucleus of an ordinary hydrogen atom of mass 1; the unit of positive electricity, being equivalent to the electron in charge and approximately to the hydrogen ion in mass. Symbol p.

proton

[prō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, protos, first
a positively charged particle that is a fundamental component of the nucleus of all atoms. The number of protons in the nucleus of an atom equals the atomic number of the element. Compare electron, neutron. See also atomic mass.

proton

A positively charged particle located in the nucleus of an atom of an element, the number of which governs its chemical properties.

pro·ton

(prō'ton)
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1, the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton

The positively-charged nucleus of a hydrogen atom. A hydrogen ion and the basis of acids.

proton,

n positively charged subatomic particle that is located in the nucleus of an atom. Its mass is equivalent to that of a neutron. The number of protons is equivalent to the atomic number.

pro·ton

(prō'ton)
The positively charged unit of the nuclear mass; protons form part (or in hydrogen 1, the whole) of the nucleus of the atom around which the negative electrons revolve.
[G. ntr. of prōtos, first]

proton (prō´ton),

n an elementary particle having a positive charge equivalent to the negative charge of the electron but possessing a mass approximately 1845 times as great; the proton is a nuclear particle, whereas the electron is extranuclear.

proton

an elementary particle of mass number 1, with a positive charge equal to the negative charge of the electron; a constituent particle of every nucleus, the number of protons in the nucleus of each atom of a chemical element being indicated by its atomic number.

proton pump
see sodium pump.
proton pump inhibitor
a class of therapeutic agents which are used to counteract the effects of proton pumps in tissues and organs, particularly used in counteracting gastric hypersecretion and acidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comprehensive analysis has been done on market share of US proton therapy center (installed base) and treatment room by company.
We are committed to supporting Proton Partners International as they bring proton beam therapy closer to home for many more patients across the UK.
Still, industry experts believe that players will miss out on a majority of cancer patients who can benefit with proton therapy, overlooking a huge multi-billion-dollar potential market.
51 TeV per beam, which is the corresponding energy for protons.
For instance, if a patient has leukemia and needs total brain radiation, then we wouldn't use proton therapy because the entire brain requires treatment.
In addition PTGM plans to launch a funding entity, called Proton Therapy Global Inc, that aims to raise several hundred million dollars for investment in individual proton centres.
For this reason, Al Rashed and the Proton manufacturer, Proton Holdings Berhad, have a viable and strong partnership to market Proton cars in Saudi Arabia.
In spite of their tiny size and lack of a characteristic shape, protons already were known to activate receptors on the surfaces of some nerve cells.
Proton has been negotiating with Volkswagen since 2004.
5] of them deposit enough energy in the scintillator to be confused with the proton signal.
The collaboration involved designing beam transport magnets, rotating three-story-high gantries for directing proton beams to patients at any angle, and positioners that will align patients accurately relative to the treatment beams.
If the proton-electron combination could be counted as a single particle, however, then the nitrogen nucleus would contain seven protons and seven proton-electron combinations, for fourteen particles--and even number.