protein metabolism


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pro·tein me·tab·o·lism

decomposition and synthesis of protein in the tissues.
Synonym(s): proteometabolism

protein metabolism

the processes whereby protein foods are used by the body to make tissue proteins, together with the processes of breakdown of tissue proteins in the production of energy. Food proteins are first broken down into amino acids, then absorbed into the bloodstream, and finally used in body cells to form new proteins. Amino acids in excess of the body's needs may be converted by liver enzymes into keto acids and urea. The keto acids may be used as sources of energy via the citric acid cycle, or they may be converted into glucose or fat for storage. Urea is excreted in urine and sweat. Growth hormone, insulin, and androgens stimulate protein formation, and adrenal cortical hormones tend to cause breakdown of body proteins. Diseases affecting protein metabolism include homocystinuria, liver disease, maple sugar urine disease, and phenylketonuria.

pro·tein me·ta·bo·lism

(prō'tēn mĕ-tab'ŏ-lizm)
Decomposition and synthesis of protein in the tissues.

pro·tein me·ta·bo·lism

(prō'tēn mĕ-tab'ŏ-lizm)
Decomposition and synthesis of protein in tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantification of patients' plasma proteins: To evaluate the protein metabolism before and after rhGH therapy plasma levels of retinol binding protein (RbP) transferrin (TRF) serum albumin (PRE) and albumin (ALB) were tested.
Emetine is an irreversible inhibitor of post-translational protein synthesis in ribosomes (Grollman, 1968), and has been used with marine invertebrates to investigate protein metabolism (Fenteany and Morse, 1993; Pace and Manahan, 2007).
Effects of tuberculosis and HIV infection on whole-body protein metabolism during feeding, measured by the [15N] glycine method.
Mean [+ or -] SD and (T)Test between pre-tests and post-tests in Protein Metabolism, Dynamic strength and Static Strength for experimental group 1.
The vitamin also plays a role in protein metabolism, immune function, the synthesis of neurotransmitters (chemical messengers between brain cells, such as serotonin and dopamine) and the generation and maintenance of adequate blood levels of glucose to fuel cellular processes.
Diets high in protein and low in fruits and vegetables result in mild "acidosis" with aging because protein metabolism releases acids into the bloodstream in amounts that override the alkalinizing effect of bicarbonate in plant foods.