protein S deficiency


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protein S deficiency

Hematology An AD condition clinically and therapeutically similar to heterozygous protein C deficiency, characterized by pulmonary thrombosis, DVT, thrombophlebitis
References in periodicals archive ?
1,2] Protein C and Protein S deficiency with or without high Homocysteine levels have been reported to be associated with thrombogenic events.
AIM: To find protein C, protein S deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia as the risk factors for thrombogenic events among patients admitted in medicine department.
Reported causes of thrombophilia in HIV-infected subjects include antiphospholipid syndrome [1], increased platelet activation [1], elevated homocysteinemia [2], elevated plasma factor VII activity [2], lupus anticoagulant [3], activated protein C resistance [3], protein C deficiency [3,4], and acquired protein S deficiency [4-10].
Twelve HIV-seropositive with laboratory-confirmed protein S deficiency were identified, and their clinical features are summarized (Table 1).
These protein deficiencies/abnormalities are genetic and include entities such as antithrombin deficiency, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin 20210, and dysfibrinogenemia, among others.
The search for risk factors for central retinal vein occlusion in this young patient revealed protein S deficiency and a history of iron deficiency.
Key Words: central retinal vein occlusion, protein S deficiency, sickle cell disease
Protein S deficiency was first described in 1984 by Comp et al.
Hopefully these new insights will result in the near future in new recommendations for the laboratory diagnosis of protein S deficiency.
Primary hypercoagulable states involve specific abnormalities of hemostasis and include antithrombin III deficiency, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, lupus anticoagulant, disorders of fibrinolytic system (eg, disorders of tissue plasminogen activator, abnormal plasminogen and hypoplasminogenemia), dysfibrinogenemia factor XII deficiency, and anticardiolipin antibody syndrome.
Protein S deficiency is the most frequent cause of idiopathic venous thrombosis, accounting for about 5% to 8% of cases[2].
In addition to the significantly differing median NRs observed between healthy donors and thrombophilia patients without FV Leiden, protein C, or protein S deficiency (PWD), the difference becomes obvious in the ROC curve analysis either with the PWD group or the healthy donor group as negative control group (Fig.