protected sex


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protected sex

(prə-tĕk′tĭd)
n.
Sexual intercourse in which a condom or other device is used to decrease the risk of pregnancy or transmitting disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
[22] It is considered unorthodox and unethical to educate children about protected sex practices and prevention of STDs in schools.
A person who thinks using a condom guarantees safe and protected sex may be led to adopt even more risky behavior.
Mary's account illustrates a common constraint that most young women in this study faced when attempting to negotiate protected sex in their relationships.
In addition, nearly half either strongly disagreed (9%) or disagreed (40%) that engaging in protected sex did not put them at risk for contracting HPV.
After all, condoms are very affordable and accessible in Hong Kong so there really shouldn't be any excuse not to have protected sex. Yet, the statistics are showing quite the opposite.
Digital alteration of protected sex may pose an insurmountable financial burden on the speech and prevent amateur and low-budget producers and actors from speaking.
The researchers also calculated that a 34% decline in the frequency of sex (or a 51% increase in protected sex) would be needed to compensate for the viral load effect seen.
We cuddled and kissed and had protected sex. We slept together more than 20 times, I slept with him after he promised to marry me," the girl told the prosecutors.
If female condoms were to be promoted along with male condoms it would increase the total number of protected sex acts.
Most had been told by health workers that they had to use condoms to avoid infecting sexual partners, but their partners often refused to have protected sex.
Judith Stonebridge, public health lead for sexual health at NHS North of Tyne, said: "If people are getting so drunk they can't remember what they did the night before, it's more than likely protected sex and condoms won't have been top of their priority list.
While disclosure of HIV status appeared to increase condom use, this did not always predict protected sex. In addition to classic perceptions about the effect of condoms on intimacy and trust, traditional gender roles, misconceptions about potential harm from condoms and fertility desires hindered condom use.
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