restoration

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restoration

 [res″to-ra´shun]
1. induction of a return to a previous state, as a return to health or replacement of a part to normal position.
3. partial or complete reconstruction of a body part.
4. the device used for such a reconstruction.
oral health restoration in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of healing for a patient who has an oral mucosa or dental lesion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tō-rā'shŭn), In dentistry:
1. A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance (for example, gold, amalgam) used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of removing decay in the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. dentistry A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance, such as gold or amalgam, used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of the removal of decay from the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, prosthetic restoration or appliance; broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopper; any substance (e.g., gold, amalgam) used for restoring missing portion of a tooth as a result of removing decay in tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about restoration

Q. What are the opportunities to restore gums? My gum on the lower jaw gets less and less, opening the roots of my teeth. Is there any technology or recurement to stop it and, hopefully, draw back?

A. Treatment of receding gums start with treating the cause - improving overall oral hygiene, including brushing habits (too powerful brushing may damage the gums), as well as periodic tooth cleaning at the dentist.

More sever situation may necessitate treatments done by a dentist. Consulting one may be wise.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/1136.htm

More discussions about restoration
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References in periodicals archive ?
Detection of prosthetic iatrogenic factors with periodontal risk on a group of patients with fixed prosthetic restorations, to analyze and to systematize the pathogenic mechanisms and correlations with the cases observed in the research.
However, in the cantilever region, there was a need for tissue conditioning by the gradual addition of self-curing resin, giving an oval characteristic to the pontic of the provisional prosthetic restoration to conform to the underlying soft tissue.
There was statistically significant association between wearing complete denture in both jaws or single complete denture (with or without other prosthetic restoration), and age.
With the application of different variants of the load on the implants in the bone tissue, the resulting pattern shows that prosthetic restorations experience a greater degree of tensile stress.
Metal-ceramic crowns are a treatment that has been, and still is, in common use for prosthetic restorations supported by natural teeth or dental implants [1, 2].
Prosthetic rehabilitation comprises the restoration of stomatoghnatic system's once lost functions, and one of the main conditions defining the success of prosthetic treatment is following the rules for oral cavity hygiene and that of prosthetic restorations [1].
The strength of a complete cast crown is superior to that of other prosthetic restorations. The margin should have a chamfer configuration, be smooth and distinct and its width should be approximately 0.5 mm, which will allow adequate bulk of metal at the margin (Rosenstiel et al., 2001).
There have been selected 655 patients, taken over through medical assistance by request, aged 20-60, having different degrees of periodontal disorders, 198 patients with unadjusted periodontal fixed prosthetic restorations. It has been followed underlining the existence of iatrogenic factors, periodontal status, appreciation of fixed prosthetic restorations quality correlated to the marginal periodontium, correlation between the clinical aspects and the x-rays (retroalveolar x-rays, OPT) in order to realise the shape, degree of osseous periodontium disorder and clear up the etiopathological aspects.
Strub, "Success rates of prosthetic restorations on endodontically treated teeth; a systematic review after 6 years," Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, vol.
In particular, RCT teeth restored with indirect prosthetic restorations (i.e., crown, bridge, and gold partial crown, with or without prefabricated posts) demonstrated a significantly lower mean fracture rate (14-year survival before fracture) than non-vital teeth provided with just a composite filling (10-year survival before fracture) [6].
It is important to consider the advantages and limitations of the screw-retained versus cemented prosthetic restorations.19 The Bridge is more esthetic in certain circumstances, as in this case majority of teeth were lost in upper arch and the remaining teeth required strength which could either be provided by a screw post or an implant.