prostaglandin


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prostaglandin

 [pros″tah-glan´din]
any of a group of naturally occurring, chemically related, long-chain hydroxy fatty acids that stimulate contractility of the uterine and other smooth muscle and have the ability to lower blood pressure, regulate acid secretion of the stomach, regulate body temperature and platelet aggregation, and control inflammation and vascular permeability. They also affect the action of certain hormones. First found in semen, they have since been found in cells throughout the body and in menstrual fluid. There are nine types, designated by the letters A to I, the degree of saturation of the side chain of each being designated by subscripts 1, 2, and 3.

Prostaglandins are used clinically to control postpartum hemorrhage, to temporarily manage patent ductus arteriosus, and to treat impotence in men; prostaglandin injections into the amniotic sac, an in-hospital procedure, have been used as an abortion technique in pregnancies after the 16th week. About 30 minutes after an injection of prostaglandin F, contractions begin, and abortion takes place within 19 to 20 hours.

pros·ta·glan·din (PG),

(pros'tă-glan'din),
Any of a class of physiologically active substances present in many tissues, with effects such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction, stimulation of intestinal or bronchial smooth muscle, uterine stimulation, and antagonism to hormones influencing lipid metabolism. Prostaglandins are prostanoic acids with side chains of varying degrees of unsaturation and varying degrees of oxidation. Often abbreviated PGA, PGB, PGC, PGD, etc. with numeric subscripts, according to structure.
[fr. genital fluids and accessory glands where discovered]

prostaglandin

(prŏs′tə-glăn′dĭn)
n.
Any of a group of potent hormonelike substances that are produced in various mammalian tissues, are derived from arachidonic acid, and mediate a wide range of physiological functions, such as control of blood pressure, contraction of smooth muscle, and modulation of inflammation.

pros·ta·glan·din

(pros'tă-glan'din)
Physiologically active substance present in many tissues, with effects such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction, stimulation of intestinal or bronchial smooth muscle, uterine stimulation, and antagonism to hormones influencing lipid metabolism.

Prostaglandin

A hormonelike chemical produced in the body. Prostaglandins have a wide variety of effects, and may be responsible for the production of some types of pain and inflammation.

pros·ta·glan·din

(pros'tă-glan'din)
Any of a class of physiologically active substances present in many tissues, with effects such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction, stimulation of intestinal or bronchial smooth muscle, uterine stimulation, and antagonism to hormones influencing lipid metabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential expression and regulation of prostaglandin E synthases in the mouse ovary during sexual maturation and luteal development.
Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2, EP3, and EP4 agonists inhibit antigen-induced mucus hypersecretion in the nasal epithelium of sensitized rats.
Kranitz et al., "One-day use of preoperative topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug prevents intraoperative prostaglandin level elevation during femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery," Current Eye Research, vol.
A randomized comparison of Foley catheter insertion versus prostaglandin E2 vaginal pessary for induction of labour in post date pregnancy.
Cuzzocrea et al., "The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 ameliorates ischemic acute renal failure," Cardiovascular Research, vol.
With regards to the efficacy of Prostaglandins as monotherapy, there are conflicting reports in the literature.
Table-2: Frequency of maternal outcome of early intervention with prostaglandin E2 in women with prom in term of caesarean section with respect to age groups.
It is concluded from the present investigation that, prostaglandin is able to synchronize estrus by inducing regression of corpus luteum.
Wolfram Goessling and Trista North, both principal faculty members of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), identified a gradient of prostaglandin E2 in the region of zebrafish embryos where stem cells differentiate into the internal organs.
To further elucidate the potential effect of prostaglandin E2 degradation on the renal PGE2 production, we examined 15-PGDH, an enzyme responsible for the prostaglandins degradation, and found no change in the kidneys of db/db mice.
Objective: To compare the efficacy and cost of misoprostol and prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2a) for mid-trimester pregnancy termination.