prosody

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pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē),
The varying rhythm, intensity, and frequency of speech that are interpreted as stress or intonation that aid meaning transmission.

pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē)
The varying rhythm, stress, and frequency of speech that aids meaning transmission.

prosody

(prŏs′ă-dē) [L. prosodia, accent of a syllable]
The normal rhythm, melody, and articulation of speech.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This attitude towards "performance" has infiltrated the world of literary prosodists, too: John Hollander, for example, is extremely contemptuous of "performative system[s] of scansion," which, he claims, are incapable of describing "the true poem" [19].
49) This approach was adopted by many turn-of-the-century acoustical prosodists, including Edward Wheeler Scripture and Warner Brown.
So he interprets our seeking both pattern and variation in verse lines as "yet another instance of a meter-minded prosodist wishing to have things both ways" (63).
Strong though the libido interpretandi was in Arnold, in this some ways palinodic late essay he insistently affirms of the greatest poems what a prosodist might say, that "their special character, their accent, is given by their diction, and, even yet more, by their movement" (p.
Thus duped into hearing verse cadence "not as it was written, by the poet's ear, but by the inept notions of prosodists," poets striving to hew to the English metrical tradition have been trying to thrash their way out of the accentual-syllabic briar patch ever since.
The three-beat rhythm (here marked by acute accents) frequently allows the possibility of what the prosodists would see as anaclasis on the last beat of the second three-time segment, as in Campion's
Although women poets did indeed shape debates about meter, in their poetic practice, in their writing about poetics (often in correspondence), and in their poetry's influence upon male prosodists, women did not generally publish books or essays on meter.
Linguistic prosodists nowadays hear the English language as fundamentally iambic; "alternation" and "avoidance of stress clash" being its basic phonological principles (Magnuson and Ryder, 808n; Liberman and Prince 311-12; Cole 73; Kager 367; Halle and Idsardi 422).
Tsur's cognitive poetics is descriptive, not normative Opposed to what he calls the bookkeeping approaches to stress and metric patterning, and to approaches that leave out the dimension of performance, Tsur describes his cognitive poetics as a "small Copernican revolution" because, unlike the majority of prosodists, Tsur brings to the understanding of what is rhythmically going on in poetry the performance of the poem and the competence (and willingness) of a reader to perform the poem.
And the sequence "leads men" poses a difficulty for prosodists who believe in metrical and unmetrical lines.
This despite the connection between the iambic line to the "natural patterns" of English speech that is often cited by prosodists.
41-42), the musical prosodists provide Phelan with a compelling point of entry into two intriguing nineteenth-century poetic experiments: the attempt, confined largely to the 1820s through the 1850s, to adapt the hexameter to English language verse, which forms the subject of chapter two; and the theorization and reemergence of Anglo-Saxon alliterative verse by the 1870s and 1880s, the focus of chapter three.