prosody

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pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē),
The varying rhythm, intensity, and frequency of speech that are interpreted as stress or intonation that aid meaning transmission.

pros·o·dy

(proz'ŏ-dē)
The varying rhythm, stress, and frequency of speech that aids meaning transmission.

prosody

(prŏs′ă-dē) [L. prosodia, accent of a syllable]
The normal rhythm, melody, and articulation of speech.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here, Swinburne does separate the homonymie rime riche, as prosodists such as Dobson mandated.
Rudy locates this conflict both within Victorian prosody (especially the battle over the "spasmodic" poets) and within the poetry and theory of mid-century prosodist Coventry Patmore.
Many prosodists have pointed out that when a spondee occurs immediately before or after a pyrrhic foot, an iambic rhythm is not significantly upset (Ransom 471; Attridge 175-86; Wallace 26).
While we do not know what intuitive rules Shakespeare or Milton or Keats or Shelley followed, we do know the rules explicitly formulated by later prosodists have been frequently violated by the greatest masters of musicality in poetry.
So he interprets our seeking both pattern and variation in verse lines as "yet another instance of a meter-minded prosodist wishing to have things both ways" (63).
38) In keeping with Helmholtz's acoustical analyses of music, they centered their researches on the embodied, rather than abstract, elements of versification, preferring the "real," scientific language of pitch and frequency over what previous prosodists had theorized in philological terms borrowed from classical metrics or, as in Patmore's case, the "imaginary" language of musical integers.
Strong though the libido interpretandi was in Arnold, in this some ways palinodic late essay he insistently affirms of the greatest poems what a prosodist might say, that "their special character, their accent, is given by their diction, and, even yet more, by their movement" (p.
Many tactical beats are not stressed, a rhythmic figure that prosodists call "promotion" ("that the land," "agitation," "investigate," "Are they assigned," "or can the countries," "the character," "or the native," "Newfoundland").
meter so as to drive prosodists "right out of their minds.
Musicologists and prosodists have considered that when music and words diverge--in composers like Brahms or Wolf--pitch and duration reside in the score while articulation and phonetic timbre reside in the poetry.
No one would deny that verse primitivism became vital with the Romantics, most famously through the ballad revival, but Byron, Shelley, and Keats are certainly as "sophisticated" prosodists as any of the 18th century.
The stand-out chapter of Form and Faith is devoted to Alfred Tennyson, a figure frequently examined by prosodists in relation to Arthur Hallam's 1831 review of Poems, Chiefly Lyrical, an essay that tends to obscure the poet's religious concerns.