prosect


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Related to prosect: Prospect theory

pro·sect

(prō-sekt'),
To dissect a cadaver or any part, that it may serve for a demonstration of anatomy.
[L. pro-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut]

pro·sect

(prō-sekt')
To dissect a cadaver or any part that it may serve for a demonstration of anatomy before a class.
[L. pro-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut]
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References in periodicals archive ?
4 overs, Glamorgan academy prosect Will Owen topping the modest batting with 32 in an innings that featured three first-ball ducks.
And Colombia are less likely to be intimidated by the prosect of playing in the clouds than other South American nations as the country's capital Bogota is 2,600 metres above sea level.
That prosect holds immense implications for Indian education, Indian gaming, and all of the other areas of American Indian policy that now assume a single Indian minority in this country.
00 metres were encountered during the initial drilling program on this prosect.
Pistorius, 27, looked nervous as he entered the North Gauteng High Court dressed in a black suit and tie, facing the prosect of a life sentence if found guilty.
The 27-year-old would relish the prosect of resurrecting his career at Ibrox, but he knows he will not be moving until December when the Champions League transfer market reopens.
Before the game had kicked off, Mackay might have been satisfied with the prosect of sharing the points at Upton Park.
Unfortunately, but understandably, our need to deal with reporting issues arising out of the financial crisis and our focus on major convergence prosects meant we made less progress on improving the conceptual framework.
SINGER & WELLS, supra note 23, at 116-118 (discussing scientific prosects for ectogenesis); Goldstein, supra note 13, at 880 (stating that "[p]ractical applications of [ectogenesis] may occur in the very near future .