prosect


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Related to prosect: Prospect theory

pro·sect

(prō-sekt'),
To dissect a cadaver or any part, that it may serve for a demonstration of anatomy.
[L. pro-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut]

pro·sect

(prō-sekt')
To dissect a cadaver or any part that it may serve for a demonstration of anatomy before a class.
[L. pro-seco, pp. -sectus, to cut]
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References in periodicals archive ?
And Colombia are less likely to be intimidated by the prosect of playing in the clouds than other South American nations as the country's capital Bogota is 2,600 metres above sea level.
That prosect holds immense implications for Indian education, Indian gaming, and all of the other areas of American Indian policy that now assume a single Indian minority in this country.
Fleetwood finished a shot outside making the play-off decider in China, but the prosect of teeing up at Harding Park in San Francisco this week is ample compensation.
Pistorius, 27, looked nervous as he entered the North Gauteng High Court dressed in a black suit and tie, facing the prosect of a life sentence if found guilty.
The 27-year-old would relish the prosect of resurrecting his career at Ibrox, but he knows he will not be moving until December when the Champions League transfer market reopens.
Before the game had kicked off, Mackay might have been satisfied with the prosect of sharing the points at Upton Park.
Medical, nursing, dental students and other disciplines allied to medicine will all learn about human anatomy in the new Learning Studio using different approaches including didactic lectures, practical sessions based on models, prosected materials, radiological images, cadaveric dissection as well as newer methods using interactive computer-based software.
In this course students do not dissect in their practical classes, but study anatomy through the inspection of prosected specimens.
Traditionally, anatomy has been taught using different approaches including didactic lectures, practical sessions based on models, prosected materials, and cadaveric dissection as well as newer methods such as computer-assisted learning models and interactive computer-based software and radiological images.
Introducing the Skill labs instead of conventional labs, employment of prosected and plastinated anatomical specimens or importing a cadaver from overseas, was another.
GA was integrated with cell biology, histology, embryology, and radiology and was taught through prosected cadavers.