drug

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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
References in periodicals archive ?
Against this depressingly tiresome backdrop, Chain Drug Review presents its "2001 Proprietary Drug Study."
Another major factor fueling sales increases in the category is the ongoing conversion of prescription products to over-the-counter status, a development that has strengthened the position of the proprietary drug industry by increasing the recognition it receives for the safety and effectiveness of its products.
Prescription-to-O-T-C switches were also responsible for strong gains in other proprietary drug segments.
The introduction of naproxen as a proprietary drug is indicative of the type of products that could go from prescription to over-the-counter status in the next few years.
Already over 400 of today's proprietary drugs, including such items as McNeil Consumer Products Co.'s Imodium A-D antidiarrheal and Sandoz Pharmaceutical Corp.'s Tavist-D and Tavist-1 cold remedies, use various ingredients and dosages that had previously been available only on a prescription basis.
According to the Nonprescription Drug Manufacturers Association (NDMA), over 400 proprietary drugs use ingredients or dosages that were available only by prescription 15 years ago.
The NDMA contends that the use of proprietary drugs resulted in savings of $10.5 billion in health care expenditures in the United States in 1987, the last year for which it has complete figures, and that those savings will approach $35 billion annually by the year 2000.
proprietary drug sales in 1991, which is the first year that Chain Drug Review has tracked the deep-discount segment's performance as part of its annual study of over-the-counter drug sales.
In 1991 drug chains recorded 29% of all proprietary drug sales.
Proprietary drugs company Ampio Pharmaceuticals Inc (NASDAQ:AMPE ) stated on Monday that Deborah Knobelman, PhD has been elected as chief business officer (CBO) of its management team.
and Syntex Inc., have announced a collaborative agreement under which TheraTech will develop transdermal delivery systems for certain Syntex proprietary drugs.
* Discount stores lost market share in proprietary drugs last year.