proposition

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proposition

[prop′əzish′ən]
Etymology: L, proponere, to place forward
1 n, a statement of a truth to be demonstrated or an operation to be performed.
2 v, to bring forward or offer for consideration, acceptance, or adoption.

proposition

(prop-uh-zish'en)
A statement about a concept or about the relationship between concepts. A proposition may be an assumption, a premise, a theorem, or a hypothesis.
See: assumption; hypothesis; premise; theorem
References in periodicals archive ?
15) Parameters of differentiation of propositionally elaborated secondary predictions Arguments (actants) Syntactic function Attributive Adverbial Same as in main scenario Different from main scenario
For the program to work, all knowledge about movable blocks had to be assembled and represented propositionally.
carry out the formal proofs propositionally, but we generally assist
as well as with cognitive material from other kinds of models (schemas may be propositionally elaborated, or figuratively mapped onto other domains).
I think the problem is, if there is a good cause that must be defended, then we have to think propositionally and carefully, with a great deal of judiciousness, about what will actually work.
Under the difficulty of thinking pure laws as such (universals are debated since the scholastic era), gradually the majority heuristically also shifted toward thinking propositionally, seeing the world as a collection of things, in the vein of science.
2]], which are propositionally equivalent, but differ temporally, since [[T.
Worsley's text here appears to suffer from a type of 'contiguity disorder': the coherent stable relations between words and concepts articulated in terms of logical propositions evidently disintegrate and give way to a series of seeming similarities, resemblances, and substitutions, albeit not logically or propositionally completely consistent ones.
We can approximate, extracting a piece of the picture, one that is propositionally manageable, and attributing that piece.
Argument will not give us access to that knowledge, because the knowledge is not propositionally available.
It cannot be a theoretically happy starting point to think of realism in terms of literal descriptiveness, for it is merely common sense that comic discourse literally describes matters of comedy, moral discourse literally describes moral matters, and likewise for any propositionally surfaced discourse where antirealism ought to be an option.
Indeed, time is a crucial feature of narratively organized accounts, whereas, as Bateson (1979:63) has noted, in propositionally organized knowledge, time has no place (see also Tsoukas 1994a:7).