proposition

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proposition

(prop-uh-zish'en)
A statement about a concept or about the relationship between concepts. A proposition may be an assumption, a premise, a theorem, or a hypothesis.
See: assumption; hypothesis; premise; theorem
References in periodicals archive ?
Concretely, I'll argue that moderate epistemic akrasia is not doxastically rational, even if we assume for the sake of the argument that it is propositionally rational.
Rather than approaching the stretch of text as someone who is experiencing the contents of the mental image directly, the reader thus approaches it as someone who is being propositionally informed of an object (or, in this case, a human character) having such-and-such properties or behaving in such-and-such manner.
We cannot say the same of propositional knowledge, as when we say that a guy knows propositionally all that can be said is that it is always possible that the subject receives the benefit of good fortune or misfortune of bad luck.
Wilbers and Duit (2001) suggested that analogy is a means of constructing (propositionally based) hypotheses on the basis of (image like) mental models and intuitive schemata triggered by the target phenomenon.
Whereas discursive theology tends to be concerned with meaning, expressed propositionally, liturgy communicates through its performance and thus expresses content specific to performative action.
anything that must be presupposed in the act of proposition-making cannot be propositionally disputed again.
The second answer comes from the exclusivist, who thinks one religion, such as Christianity, is propositionally truer than all other religions and this one religion is ontologically necessary (the objective conditions for salvation or enlightenment must really be in place, such as Christ really dying and rising again) and epistemologically necessary (those seeking salvation or enlightenment must know about the conditions, for instance, they must hear about Christ's death and resurrection) in order for salvation even to be possible.
Such knowledge is not always easily described propositionally, but is manifest in the manner of one's life.
The thought, rather, is that we can never capture propositionally, scientifically or otherwise, the richness or kind of information presented by experience.
involves many preconceptual and nonpropositional structures of experience (such as image schemata) that can be metaphorically projected and propositionally elaborated to constitute our network of meanings.
Amenabar's starting point, by contrast, is not the compatibility of global skepticism with the world of ordinary appearances, but rather what I would call the "epistemically equivocal" status of the body: in a certain sense the body is prereflectively "given" as a precondition of experience, yet to the extent that we wish to characterize its meaning propositionally or conceptually, we cannot help but become vulnerable to the doubts of the skeptic.