prophylactic

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prophylactic

 [pro″fĭ-lak´tik]
1. pertaining to prophylaxis.
2. tending to ward off disease.
3. an agent that so acts.
4. condom.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik),
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis. Synonym(s): preventive
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
[G. prophylaktikos; see prophylaxis]

prophylactic

(prō′fə-lăk′tĭk, prŏf′ə-)
adj.
Acting to defend against or prevent something, especially disease; protective.
n.
1. A prophylactic agent, device, or measure, such as a vaccine or drug.
2. A contraceptive device, especially a condom.

pro′phy·lac′ti·cal·ly adv.

prophylactic

adjective Referring to a preventive manoeuvre.

noun An older term for condom.

prophylactic

Medtalk adjective Preventive, protective noun A drug, vaccine, regimen, or device designed to prevent or protect against a given disorder Vox populi Condom, see there.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. An agent that acts to prevent a disease.
3. Colloq. used to mean condom, and to a lesser extent, a method of birth control.

prophylactic

And any act, procedure, drug or equipment used to guard against or prevent an unwanted outcome, such as a disease.

Prophylactic

Guarding from or preventing the spread or occurrence of disease or infection.

prophylactic 

1. Preventing disease. 2. An agent or a remedy that either prevents the development of a disease or prevents the worsening of a disease process.

pro·phy·lac·tic

(prō'fi-lak'tik)
1. Preventing disease; relating to prophylaxis.
Synonym(s): preventive.
2. Agent that acts to prevent disease. e.g., a condom
[G. prophylaktikos; see etymology of prophylaxis]
References in periodicals archive ?
Prophylactic vaccination for viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes is a completely innovative concept, primarily because only recently have cost-effective situations been identified.
Prophylactic vaccination should be considered only when circumstantial evidence indicates that a given area is at risk.
The choice of vaccine is crucial to the outcome of prophylactic vaccination campaigns.
The main problem is that the virus against which vaccination is directed must have a different N subtype than the virus present in the vaccine, which, for prophylactic vaccination, is impossible to establish beforehand.
Prophylactic vaccination should be continued as long as risk for infection exists.
Human papilloma virus (HPV) prophylactic vaccination: Challenges for public health and implications for screening.