prophylactic anticoagulation


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prophylactic anticoagulation

The administration of anticoagulant drugs to patients who have a high risk for venous thromboembolism, e.g., patients admitted to medical wards of hospitals or undergoing certain forms of surgery, esp. on the hips or knees.

CAUTION!

The practice reduces the likelihood of the formation of blood clots but increases the risk of bleeding.
See also: anticoagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors recommend using prophylactic anticoagulation in high-risk patients, but not in everyone due to the cost of treatment and potential side effects of major bleeding.
* Although pre-operative initiation of prophylactic anticoagulation is desirable, there are data indicating that starting prophylaxis postoperatively is adequate.
A meta-analysis in the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines reviewing data from 1953 orthopedic and medical patients who were mostly postoperative (and not including pregnant women) found that prophylactic anticoagulation with LMWH for patients at risk for VTE produced a relative risk for recurrent VTE of 0.36 (95% CI, 0.20-0.67).
At present, insufficient data exists to determine the benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation in the gravid patient with a history of CVT (van der Stege, Engelen, & van Eyck, 1997).
New guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians stress the long-term maintenance (3 weeks) of prophylactic anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin after discharge for knee and hip arthroplasty.
A further sub-group analysis showed that the incidence of thrombotic-embolism events decreased significantly after the introduction of prophylactic anticoagulation [Figure 5].{Figure 5}