prophage


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prophage

 [pro´fāj]
the latent stage of a bacteriophage in a lysogenic bacterium, in which the viral genome becomes inserted into a specific portion of the host chromosome and is duplicated into each cell generation.

pro·bac·te·ri·o·phage

(prō'bak-tē'rē-ō-fāj'),
The stage of a temperate bacteriophage in which the genome is incorporated in the genetic apparatus of the bacterial host.
Synonym(s): prophage

prophage

/pro·phage/ (pro´fāj) the latent stage of a phage in a lysogenic bacterium, in which the viral genome becomes inserted into a specific portion of the host chromosome and is duplicated in each cell generation.

prophage

(prō′fāj′)
n.
The latent form of a bacteriophage in which the viral genes are incorporated into the bacterial chromosomes without causing disruption of the bacterial cell.

pro·bac·te·ri·o·phage

(prō'bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
The stage of a temperate bacteriophage in which the genome is incorporated into the genetic apparatus of the bacterial host.
Synonym(s): prophage.

prophage

the DNA of a BACTERIOPHAGE that is repressed (see GENE REPRESSION) for LYTIC functions and that is maintained in the host bacterium in a stable state. The prophage may be integrated into the DNA of its bacterial host and may be replicated along with the host DNA, as is the case for BACTERIOPHAGE LAMBDA, or may be maintained as EXTRACHROMOSOMAL DNA, as is the case for bacteriophage P1. Prophage DNA may be carried between GENERATIONS (2) in this state and no phage particles are produced. However, the prophage normally retains the ability to direct a lytic cycle, by the activation of genes for lytic development. Upon INDUCTION (3), progeny phages are produced and released from the host. see LYSOGENY.

prophage

the latent stage of a bacteriophage in a lysogenic bacterium, in which the viral genome becomes inserted usually at a specific location within the host chromosome and is duplicated into each cell generation.
References in periodicals archive ?
PHAST identified 15 prophage interruptions in 122262, of which 5 were homologous in nucleotide identity to Sp2, Sp3, Sp6, Sp8, and Sp14 found in Sakai (16) (Table 2; Figure 1).
The genome possesses 8 to 10 prophages and nonfunctional phage remnants.
In addition there is further genetic diversity provided by plasmids, islets, prophages, and phage remnants.
The Prophage Series G vaccines (HSPPC-96; vitespen) are being studied in two different settings of glioma: newly diagnosed and recurrent disease.
cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes co-existed suggesting the horizontal CTX prophage exchange between strains of the two principal biotypes in order for the infecting strains to be more adapted to the host hostile intestinal environment (15) which conformed to the more severe cholera symptoms in the afflicted hosts in the recent years (3,22,24).
Characterization of VPI pathogenicity island and CTXO prophage in environmental strains of Vibrio cholerae.
Each time the bacterial cell containing the prophage (known as a lysogenic cell) undergoes binary fission, the phage DNA is replicated and passed on to each daughter cell along with the bacterial DNA.
The toxin genes from the three species are located on the plasmids and the genes tend to cluster in "islands" that sometimes are mobilized by viruses that integrate themselves into the plasmid as prophage.
Induction of prophage [lambda] by daunorubicin and derivatives: correlation with antineoplastic activity.
A repressor protein of bacteriophage P1, encoded by the c1 gene, is responsible for maintaining P1 prophage in the lysogenic state.