prop

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Related to property: property tax, property room

prop

A device of sturdy material used to support or hold something in place.

mouth prop

A metal or rubber device inserted between the jaws to maintain the mouth in an open position. Synonym: bite block
References in classic literature ?
Is it to be exercised in a discrimination between the different departments of industry, or between the different kinds of property, or between the different degrees of property?
If this partiality is to be exerted in favor of those who are concerned in any particular description of industry or property, I presume it will readily be admitted, that the competition for it will lie between landed men and merchants.
The property of causing such a cycle of occurrences is called "discomfort"; the property of the mental occurrences in which the cycle ends is called " pleasure." The actions constituting the cycle must not be purely mechanical, i.e.
From what I have said it will be perceived that there is a vast difference between 'personal property' and 'real estate' in the valley of Typee.
Modern bourgeois society with its relations of production, of exchange and of property, a society that has conjured up such gigantic means of production and of exchange, is like the sorcerer, who is no longer able to control the powers of the nether world whom he has called up by his spells.
The proletarian is without property; his relation to his wife and children has no longer anything in common with the bourgeois family-relations; modern industrial labour, modern subjection to capital, the same in England as in France, in America as in Germany, has stripped him of every trace of national character.
It was not however found easy to embody the readily admitted principle that property should make law for property, and persons for persons; since persons and property mixed themselves in every transaction.
In like manner to every particle of property belongs its own attraction.
The apportionment of taxes on the various descriptions of property is an act which seems to require the most exact impartiality; yet there is, perhaps, no legislative act in which greater opportunity and temptation are given to a predominant party to trample on the rules of justice.
Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.
Of course, it might be said that the Individualism generated under conditions of private property is not always, or even as a rule, of a fine or wonderful type, and that the poor, if they have not culture and charm, have still many virtues.
Nevertheless a prince ought to inspire fear in such a way that, if he does not win love, he avoids hatred; because he can endure very well being feared whilst he is not hated, which will always be as long as he abstains from the property of his citizens and subjects and from their women.

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