acetone

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Related to propanone: propanal

acetone

 [as´ĕ-tōn]
a compound, CH3·CO·CH3, with a characteristic odor; it is used as a solvent and as an antiseptic. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies produced in abnormal amounts in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and metabolic acidosis. See also ketosis.

ac·e·tone

(as'e-tōn),
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath. Acetone is one of the ketone bodies, and is used as a solvent in many pharmaceutical and commercial preparations.
Synonym(s): dimethyl ketone

acetone

(ăs′ĭ-tōn′)
n.
A colorless, volatile, extremely flammable liquid ketone, C3H6O, widely used as an organic solvent. It is one of the ketone bodies that accumulate in the blood and urine when fat is being metabolized.

ac′e·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

Acetone

Chemistry A colourless, highly volatile and flammable solvent* which is the simplest ketone. It mixes with water, ethanol and oil; it melts at 95.4º C and boils at 56º C.
Endocrinology A so-called ketone body which is normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals, produced by oxidation of fats. Ketones are increased in diabetes, markedly so in diabetic ketoacidosis and starvation. 
Toxic range > 20 mg/dL
*Acetone is used as a solvent in chemical, cosmetic—e.g., nail polish remover—and pharmaceutical industries.

acetone

Endocrinology A ketone body normally present in scant amounts in the urine and serum of normal individuals produced by oxidation of fats; ketones ↑ in DM, DKA, starvation. See Ketone body.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, inflammable liquid; small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in urine and blood of diabetic patients; sometimes imparts an ethereal odor to the urine and breath as a result of starvation or excessive vomiting. Used as a solvent in some pharmaceutical and commercial preparations and as a fixative for fluorescent antibody stains.

acetone

A KETONE body derived from acetyl coenzyme A in untreated DIABETES or starvation. See also ACETONE BODY.

acetone 

Liquid ketone (dimethyl ketone and propanone) used as a solvent for many organic compounds (e.g. cellulose acetate) and for repairing spectacle frames.

ac·e·tone

(as'ĕ-tōn)
A colorless, volatile, flammable liquid; extremely small amounts are found in normal urine, but larger quantities occur in the urine and blood of people with diabetes, sometimes imparting an ethereal odor to the urine and breath.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider the association of two substances A and B (propanone and trichloromethane, for example) to occur by the following mechanisms, as Durov and Shilov described, [2]
The activities of the species A (propanone) and B (trichloromethane) are calculated in a conventional manner, from liquid-vapour equilibrium data at constant temperature (liquid composition [x.sub.i], vapour composition [y.sub.i] and vapour pressure of the mixtures p):
Solvents of different polarities, xylene, and propanone, were used on the tests.
Resistance to solvents (xylene and propanone) and gel content were significantly higher for the latex containing AcFAD than for the reference acrylic latex.
For instance, following the ban on trade and use of pseudoephedrine in Mexico in 2008, Mexico-based traffickers gradually moved away from using the phosphorus- iodine production method (which uses pseudoephedrine as a precursor) to the Phenyl-2- propanone (P2P) method (which does not require pseudoephedrine).
A recent 2010 seizure of a Hong Kong methamphetamine lab involved a mainland chemist and phenyl-2- propanone (P2P) likely produced in and acquired from mainland China.