propagule


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propagule

  1. an infective stage of a plant PATHOGEN such as a fungal spore, by which the organism gains entry into a plant host.
  2. any part of an organism that is liberated from the adult form and which can give rise to a new individual, such as a fertilized egg or spore.
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This treatment stimulates the development of propagules in place of flowers and fruitlets.
The first step in the invasion process is related to the introduction of propagules (Levine, 2008).
Therefore, in order to avoid those drawbacks, it would be crucial that planting material represents a minimum level of intraspecific diversity to ensure that its progeny would not only be viable but also produce viable propagules.
This likely occurred as a result of a higher density of infective propagules in IV inoculum (156 per g), which was four times higher than that in PS inoculum (39 per g) as measured by Restrepo-Llano et al.
However, the mini-cutting presents some advantages over cuttings, as size reduction of cuttings and increased shoots productivity per area, and youth use of propagules (DIAS et al., 2012).
Kruskal-Wallis analysis was used to test the significance of differences among treatments and times for each species of mangrove propagule. All microbial analysis was done in triplicate and data computation employed the Statistic 10.0 software.
It was reported that the ability of taro to emerge from the soil is affected by propagule size (Mabhaudhi et al., 2013).
We do not believe this means beavers are not affected by the problems small populations face, but these examples do represent instances of extraordinarily successful biological invasions, initiated with a very low propagule pressure.
Interestingly, this "alignment-of-fitness" requires a "bottleneck" or unicellular stage when the organism consists of just one cell-a spore, zygote, or uninucleate asexual propagule.