pronouncing death

pronouncing death

Forensic medicine The act of monitoring–eg, with a stethoscope or an EKG a Pt's condition and determining the time of death. See Harvard criteria. Cf Certifying death.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
I have no regret in pronouncing death sentence to the accused.
The principles that support RNs pronouncing death are:
NOTE: This Ask a Practice Consultant article replaces the former NANB Position Statement: Registered Nurses Pronouncing Death (2014).
Given procedural delays, errors in IV line insertion, and delays in pronouncing death, the whole process takes around 10 minutes.
* The coroner, after pronouncing death, told the lead investigator that he believed this to be a "classic suicide";
To the Editor: Before using brain criteria, pronouncing death in humans was based on irreversible loss of something vaguely thought of as respiration or circulation or cardiac function.
(That case still requires that we confirm the empirical claim that circulation was indeed irreversibly lost after the mere seventy-five seconds before pronouncing death. It also requires that we accept the slippery normative use of the term "irreversible.")
Arkas even turns his nihilistic satire against his own poetics, by having the final voice heard (for the first time) in the play be that of the surgeon pronouncing death and organ harvesting, thus reminding his rapt audience that this whole drama of desperate survival has been nothing but the imperceptible death of one drunk loser.
The Nurses Association of New Brunswick (NANB) encourages employers to develop policies that support RNs in pronouncing death.
The physician will then pronounce the patient dead or, to provide an additional margin of safety, in some cases will wait an additional two to five minutes after cardiac function has stopped before pronouncing death. At this point the physician and any family that is present would withdraw, and the transplant team, which has been prepped and waiting in an adjoining room, will enter and retrieve organs from the recently dead cadaver.
To guard against such mistakes, NHBD programs have traditionally waited a few minutes after determining that cardiopulmonary function has ceased before pronouncing death and beginning organ retrieval.
Many doctors, and some authorities, would in unguarded moments speak of pronouncing death on a brain-dead patient, so that life supports could be removed and the patient "allowed to die." To some, the fact that brain-dead patients could not be kept "alive" for more than a few weeks even with intensive care was sufficient reason for accepting the new definition.