pronator syndrome

pronator syndrome

, Pronator teres syndrome
A neurological disorder caused by entrapment of the median nerve at the elbow. Symptoms and signs include aching in the wrist with a subjective feeling of poor coordination; paresthesias extending into the hand; paresis of the thumb muscles; pain on pronation of the forearm and flexion of the wrist against resistance; and tenderness in the proximal thenar muscles. A positive Tinel's sign over the pronator teres muscles may be present. The disease usually affects the dominant arm in men. The condition may be treated with corticosteroid injections or orthopedic surgery.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
[7] The presence of a PMA may result in several complications such as CTS, digital ischemia, pronator syndrome, or anterior interosseous nerve syndrome.
Pronator syndrome (PS) is a proximal median neuropathy that may present in isolation or in combination with CTS as a double crush syndrome.
Intraepineurial constriction of nerve fascicles in pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome.
Piercing of the MN has been implicated in the causation of the pronator syndrome (Jones & Ming, 1988), but McCormack et al.
Persistent median artery as a cause of pronator syndrome. J.
Cumulative traumatic disorders that dental practitioners face are carpel tunnel syndrome, ulnar or radial nerve entrapment, pronator syndrome, tendinitis, extensor wad strain, and thoracic outlet syndrome.
Entrapment of the median nerve in the elbow and proximal forearm has been involved as one of the reasons of the pronator syndrome. [sup][1]
Although there are several locations for median nerve entrapment like ligament of struthers, anomalous arteries, and muscles, but the pronator syndrome remains the most common reason for compression neuropathies of median nerve in the forearm.
Extreme pronations, together with the higher velocities and accelerations required to pick up a six-pack, may be responsible for any cases of pronator syndrome that can be caused by repeated pronation coupled with force.
These extreme motions, if combined with forceful gripping, may increase the likelihood of a bagger developing pronator syndrome or DeQuervain's syndrome.
The treatment of pronator syndrome could be making easier with the knowledge of the anatomical distribution of nerves.
Classical compression syndromes of the median nerve are described as pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (Dellon & Mackinnon).